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What Is a Balance Transfer and How Do They Help?

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A balance transfer happens when you move your debt
from one or more sources to a single credit card with a lower interest rate. By
paying less interest, more of your payment goes toward the principal balance.

Balance transfers aren’t always the best way to get debt relief, however. You should carefully consider the benefits and downsides to balance transfers before initiating the process.  

How a Balance Transfer Works

With a balance transfer, you transition the amount you owe from one card
to another. You can also move other types of debt to a credit card. For
example, some issuers may allow the transfer of auto and personal loans.

Here are the five steps to completing
a balance transfer.

1. Choose a
balance transfer card:
You can either open a new credit card for the transfer or
transition your debt to a card you already have. Look at interest rates,
balance transfer fees and other terms to make the best choice.

2. Decide on
your transfer amount:
Look at the credit limit you have and ensure the balance
will be less than your limit. Ideally, the transfer is much lower than your
credit limit and lowers your credit utilization ratio in the process.

You’ll also want to look at balance transfer fees,
which are usually around three percent of the amount you’re transferring. Some
cards also have limits on transfer balance amounts. Check your card details
carefully.

3. Review the
terms and conditions:
Make sure you’ve read all of the terms, fees and official
agreements before transferring the balance. While the fine print can be
lengthy, you need to know exactly what it is you’re agreeing to.

4. Initiate the transfer: There are a few different ways you can initiate a transfer—through your credit card’s online account, or calling the customer service line of your credit card company, for example—but how you do so will depend on the policies of your credit card company.

5. Pay off your debt: Make monthly payments toward your balance transfer. Create a plan to pay your debt off within the introductory period, so you don’t have to pay any interest on it.

How a Balance Transfer Affects Credit Score

Balance transfers can either improve or lower your
credit score, depending on multiple factors. Here’s how:

Your credit utilization rate: If you’re able to pay off more of your debt due to the lower
interest rate, your credit score will improve. By paying off debt, you’re using
less of your available credit, which lowers your credit utilization ratio.

Making on-time
payments:
Paying your credit card bill on time boosts your credit
score, as payment history is the most significant factor in scoring models like
FICO®. Balance
transfers can help in this area if the transfer makes it easier to pay.

Number of hard
inquiries:

Your credit score takes a hit when you apply for several credit cards at once
because they each trigger a hard inquiry.

Hard inquiries aren’t bad in and of themselves and are a necessary part of applying for credit. That being said, if you have a large number of hard inquiries on your credit report within a short time frame—if you apply for many credit cards at once, for example—it signals to lenders that you may not be responsible with your credit.

Average age of credit: Your credit score is also based on the average age of your credit. It would be more beneficial to your credit to keep your old accounts open even after you’ve transferred the balance. This will increase the average age of your credit accounts. More open cards also help keep your credit utilization rate low.

Credit Factors Balance Transfer Affect Image

When to Consider a Balance Transfer

A balance transfer can help you pay off debt faster
and pay less overall. Here are the main scenarios when a balance transfer can
help.

You have debt with a high-interest rate: If you have a credit card—or many cards—with high-interest rates, it may be good to transfer the balance to a card with a lower rate. By lowering interest, you’re able to pay more toward the principal balance and pay off debt faster.

It’s difficult
to juggle multiple payments:
You can combine debts by transferring them all to a single
card, which will allow you to only have to keep track of one payment every pay
period.

You can get a good promotional offer: Many credit cards offer low or no interest rates during the introductory period (usually six – 18 months). By transferring your debt, you can save money in the long run.

How to Choose the Best Balance Transfer Card

Balance transfer credit cards compete with other
credit cards by offering good introductory APRs (annual percentage rates) to
attract new cardholders. Generally, the better your credit, the more options
you have for low introductory rates and no transfer fees.

Here are a few other things to consider when shopping
around.

Balance
transfer fee:
A fee for transferring a balance is common. It’s usually about three
percent of the balance amount (like we stated above). If you have a good credit
score, it’s possible that the balance transfer fee might be waived entirely.

Interest rate: Interest rates vary
significantly between cards. Some promotional incentives may offer introductory
zero percent APR. However, be sure to look at what the APR is after the
introductory period, in case you don’t pay off all your debt in that timeframe.

Length of
promotional period:
The introductory promotional period for balance transfers is
usually six – 18 months. A longer promotional period allows you more time to
pay off the debt before a higher interest rate is applied.

Annual fee: Some cards charge a fee each
year to keep the card active. Be on the watch for high annual fees.

Credit limit on
a new card:
A
higher credit limit can help you maintain a lower credit utilization rate. If
you’re transferring a balance, make sure your credit card limit far exceeds the
balance you’re transferring.

Basic requirements: It’s best to apply for a card that you have a good chance of being approved for. When you apply for a credit card and aren’t approved, the hard inquiry will remain on your credit report. As we said above, too many hard inquiries occurring in a short time period can lower your credit score.

Key Balance Transfer Card Features to Compare Image

Generally, if the amount you save with a lower interest rate is higher than the balance transfer fee, it may be worth transferring the balance. It’s also ideal if you can pay off the balance during the zero percent interest period, and avoid paying interest on any of your debt.

What to Do After You’ve Transferred Your Balance

After you’ve transferred your balance, there are a few
things you can do to improve your credit score and pay off your debt.

Make timely
payments:

On-time payments boost your credit score. Any late or insufficient payments can
potentially invalidate lower interest rates and harm your credit score.

Note important
dates:
Set
reminders for when the introductory period ends. Any debt you don’t pay off
during that period will be charged with greater interest rates. You’ll also
want to make sure you complete the transfer within the given timeframe.

Create a plan
to pay off debt within the zero percent timeframe:
Design a budget that works for you to
pay off your debt, ideally within the zero percent interest timeframe. This
might include scaling back on expenses or picking up extra shifts at work. In
the long run, it could save you quite a bit.

Don’t make purchases on your new card: When you make a payment, the funds go to your purchases first, then your transfer balance. Try to use a different method of payment to make purchases, so your credit card payments only go toward your older debt.

Keep your old cards open: By keeping other cards open, your total available credit limit is higher—meaning your utilization ratio is lower. Having older cards also increases the average age of your credit accounts.

Why You Should Check Your Credit Report After a
Balance Transfer

Mistakes sometimes happen when there is a lot of
activity on your credit report, such as data errors and information that should
no longer be on your report.

These inaccuracies can unfairly affect your credit score.
For example, some of your credit reports might not reflect the balance transfer
properly. Credit repair can help you review your
report, identify errors, and work to correct—giving your credit score a boost.
Contact the credit repair consultants at Lexington Law to learn how we can help
you.

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Credit Cards

What is purchase APR for credit cards?

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

A purchase annual percentage rate (APR) determines the amount of interest that is added to an outstanding credit card balance each month. While the rate is calculated by the year, the interest charge is added monthly to the unpaid balance.

Most credit cards include a purchase APR—annual percentage rate—that is used to calculate the interest on an unpaid credit card balance. 

While APR is an annual percentage rate, credit card interest is actually applied monthly by calculating one-twelfth of the APR. For example, a credit card with an APR of 24 percent would have a 2 percent interest charge added monthly to any outstanding balance. 

Since APR is only applied to outstanding balances, interest charges can be avoided entirely by paying off the full balance of a credit card by the due date each month. 

Read on to learn more about different aspects of APR as well as real-world examples of how APR works. 

Important aspects of credit card APR

Although APR is a straightforward calculation, there are a few important details to consider when looking at a credit card’s APR. Keep in mind that credit cards often have multiple APRs and that APR can change over time. 

Credit cards often have multiple APRs

When discussing APR, most people refer to a credit card’s “purchase APR,” also referred to as “standard purchase APR.” This is the rate that’s applied to regular purchases, including goods and services. 

Different types of APR. Purchase APR, cash advance APR, penalty APR and balance transfer APR.

However, credit cards can do more than just make purchases, so there are several other APRs depending on the activity:

  • Cash advance APR: If you use a credit card to receive a cash advance, you’ll pay interest according to the cash advance APR. Often, the rate for cash advances is higher than normal purchases. Also, interest typically begins to accrue immediately rather than after the due date for the monthly bill. 
  • Balance transfer APR: After you transfer a balance from any line of credit to a credit card, interest will begin to accrue at the rate set by the balance transfer APR. Some credit cards offer a promotional period where transferred balances accrue no interest. 
  • Penalty APR: When your credit card payments are late—typically by more than 60 days—many credit card companies will institute a higher penalty APR, which can affect both the outstanding balance as well as future purchases on the credit card. Penalty APRs can also be activated for other reasons outlined in a cardholder agreement. 

Understanding all of these different kinds of APR makes it easier for you to use credit cards to their fullest while avoiding costly interest payments. 

That said, it’s also important to note that APR is not a permanent number, and it can change over time for a variety of reasons.

APR can change over time

The initial APR for purchases and other activities will be laid out in the cardholder agreement you sign when the card is issued. Typical APR ranges from 15 percent to 22 percent, but cards can have higher or lower APR for a variety of reasons. In any case, the initial APR for your credit card may change over time.

Reasons APR may change over time.

Here’s what you need to know about how and why APR changes over time.

  • Introductory APR: Some credit cards include a lower introductory or promotional APR for a set period of time, usually between three and 24 months after the credit account is opened. After the introductory period ends, a higher APR takes effect. 
  • Variable APR: Some credit cards have a variable APR that is tied to economic factors, like the “prime rate,” which is published by the U.S. Federal Reserve. As this number changes, the APR on your credit card will change as well. 
  • Penalty APR: As noted above, certain actions—like late payments—can lead to a penalty APR that is often significantly higher than the standard APR. The APR often decreases again after six months or more of on-time payments. 
  • Credit score change: If you have a significant change in your credit score, the credit card company may raise or lower your purchase APR accordingly. 

Although APR can change, credit card companies are generally not allowed to change your APR in the first year of your account’s existence. Credit card issuers typically provide notice at least 45 days before increasing a card’s APR. There are a few exceptions to this rule, however, like if your promotional period ends within the first 12 months of your account being opened. 

Let’s take a look at some examples of how purchase APR works. 

Examples of purchase APR

Looking more closely at different purchase APRs makes it clear that interest rates make a big difference when you carry a balance on your credit card.

Example of how purchase APR works.

Let’s imagine that you purchase a $2,500 exercise bike with your credit card and plan to pay off the balance over the next 21 months. 

With a credit card that has a 25 percent APR, you’ll spend $148 each month to pay off the balance for that purchase, and you’ll have paid for more than $600 of interest along the way. 

With a credit card that has a 15 percent APR, your monthly payment will be $136 until the balance is paid off, and you’ll accrue $358 of interest as you make payments.

With a credit card that has a promotional 0 percent APR for 12 months (then a 15 percent APR), your monthly payment will be $122, and you’ll only accrue $66 of interest over the course of the 21 months.

Clearly, different purchase APR can make a big difference when it comes to paying off credit card debt. 

Getting a card with a low APR may depend on a person’s credit history, if you need help managing your credit profile, Lexington Law Firm provides qualified credit repair services. 


Reviewed by Horacio Celaya, Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Horacio Celaya was born in Tucson, Arizona but eventually moved with his family to Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. Mr. Celaya went on to graduate with Honors from the Autonomous University of Baja California Law School. Mr. Celaya is a graduate of the University of Arizona where he graduated from James E. Rogers College of Law. During law school, Mr. Celaya received his certificate in International Trade Law, completing his thesis on United States foreign direct investment in Latin America. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Celaya has worked in an immigration firm where he helped foreign investors organize their assets in order to apply for investment-based visas. He also has extensive experience in debt settlement negotiations on behalf of clients looking to achieve debt relief. Mr. Celaya is licensed to practice law in New Mexico. He is located in the Phoenix office. 

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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Credit Cards

3 ways to remove a closed account from your credit report

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

You can remove closed accounts from your credit report in three main ways: dispute any inaccuracies, write a formal “goodwill letter” requesting removal or simply wait for the closed accounts to be removed over time. That said, removing closed accounts can affect your credit score, so make sure you consider your situation first.

While it’s not always possible to remove a closed account from your credit report, it is straightforward to attempt to do so. However, it’s not always beneficial to remove closed accounts, and in some cases, it could even lower your credit score.

In general, you should try to remove a closed account with inaccurate negative information, but you should probably leave any accounts that are yours that are having a positive effect on your credit history.

Below, we’ll talk about whether you should try to remove closed accounts from your credit report, how closed accounts may affect your credit score and how to remove closed accounts. 

Should you remove closed accounts from your credit report?

You should attempt to remove closed accounts that contain inaccurate information or negative items that are eligible for removal. Otherwise, there is generally no need to remove closed accounts from your credit report. Inaccurate information could be pulling down your credit score and should be addressed, but older accounts with a good history may be helping your score. 

Even after closing an account—like a personal loan or credit card—the information related to your balances and payment history stays on your credit report for many years. In fact, both accounts closed in good standing and negative items or collection accounts may remain on your credit report for seven to 10 years. 

Deciding whether to try to remove a closed account ultimately comes down to understanding the factors that affect your credit score.

Deciding whether to remove closed accounts. Try to remove close accounts if they are: inaccurate, negative, fraudulent. You can leave closed accounts if they are: in good standing, helpful for credit utilization, beneficial for credit history.

Your credit score is calculated based on five main factors: payment history (35 percent), credit utilization (30 percent), length of credit history (15 percent), different types of credit (10 percent) and new credit (10 percent). 

Because a credit report includes both open and closed accounts, some of these credit factors can be affected by a closed account being removed from your report. For example, if you made payments on a personal loan for a number of years and that account is removed from your report, your length of credit history could decrease.

Having a closed account removed from your report may not affect your score, but in many cases, it is wise to leave accounts in good standing on your report, as they could have a positive impact overall. 

However, closed accounts with negative items eligible for removal and inaccurate information can lead to a lower score, so working to get those accounts removed is part of a sound credit repair strategy. 

Read on to learn how to get rid of closed accounts from your credit report.

How to remove closed accounts from your credit report

If you need to attempt to remove a closed account from your credit report—especially one that includes inaccurate information or negative items—there are three ways to do so. You can either dispute inaccurate information with the credit bureaus, write a formal “goodwill letter” to request removal or simply wait until the account is removed after a period of time. Each of these approaches can be useful depending on your particular situation.

Three ways to remove a closed account from your credit report: dispute inaccurate information, wait for the account to drop off your report, write a "goodwill letter."

Read on to learn more about when to try each of these different methods for getting a closed account off your credit report.

1. Dispute inaccurate information

If a closed account on your credit report includes inaccurate information, you can dispute the information and potentially get the item removed from your report. 

You can dispute the information using the following process:

  1. Send a letter to the three major credit bureaus—TransUnion®, Experian® and Equifax®—that explains what information you are challenging, why you believe it is inaccurate and that you would like it removed.
  2. Similarly, send a letter to the financial institution that provided the information to the bureaus.
  3. Wait for responses, then look at your updated report and score.

We have a guide that details the dispute process to help you along the way. 

2. Write a “goodwill” letter

A goodwill letter is a formal request to a creditor asking for a negative item to be removed. 

Although creditors are not required to remove negative items upon request, they may be willing to do so if you have a long history with them or if there were special hardships that led to the negative item. 

However, goodwill letters are generally useful only for late or missed payments rather than collections, repossessions or other more significant negative items.

In addition to goodwill letters, you can also request that an account is removed using a “pay for delete” letter. These letters can lead to an agreement with a collection agency to remove an account in exchange for a set payment. That said, the collection agency may decide not to remove the account, and the original account that went to collections may remain on your report. 

3. Wait for the closed account to be removed over time

Closed accounts do not stay on your report forever, so it’s possible to simply wait it out until a closed account is removed.

Accounts that were closed can remain on a credit report for around seven to 10 years. 

When an older closed account with negative information is potentially lowering your score, eventually it will drop off your report. Additionally, positive information about closed accounts also leaves your report over time, so it’s important to continue to practice good credit habits with a variety of account types.

If your credit report contains closed accounts with negative items or inaccurate information, the team at Lexington Law Firm can assist you with credit repair. By analyzing your credit report and assisting with disputes, our team can help you make strides in improving your credit score.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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Do debt consolidation loans hurt your credit?

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

When done correctly, debt consolidation loans usually do not hurt your credit long-term. In fact, there’s a good chance that they will ultimately improve your credit. However, debt consolidation can initially knock your score down a bit, which is why it’s important to do your due diligence before pursuing this strategy.

Debt consolidation is a way to combine multiple debts into a single loan. This not only reduces the interest you owe, but it also helps you organize your debt, making payments more manageable.

Debt consolidation can have positive and negative effects on your credit score. Here are a few areas it may negatively impact:

  • Credit applications: Applying for a personal loan or a balance transfer card requires that a hard inquiry be performed on your credit. This will likely lower your score a bit initially as you get the consolidation process started.
  • Average age of credit: The ages of your credit accounts matter, with older accounts garnering better credit scores. When you open a new account, it lowers your average credit age, which may initially negatively impact your score.

On the other hand, the following categories tend to be positively impacted by debt consolidation:

  • Credit utilization: A new debt consolidation account will usually increase the amount of available credit you have. As long as you don’t begin spending significantly more after opening the new account, you’ll be using less of your available credit, which will benefit your score.
  • Payment history: If you consistently pay off your new loan on time, your credit will likely be positively impacted.

Effects on credit score depend on the debt consolidation method

Each debt consolidation method comes with its own benefits and drawbacks. It’s important to acquaint yourself with the potential impacts of each method to make sure that consolidating debt results in a net gain for your credit health.

Balance transfer

A balance transfer is the process of transferring debt to a single credit card with a lower interest rate, allowing you to pay off your debts for less. Many balance transfer cards offer zero-percent APR during an introductory period, providing a window to pay off debt interest-free.

Despite the benefits offered, a balance transfer card could damage your credit score. First, applying for a new credit card may warrant a hard inquiry, which can bump your score down a bit. Second, your credit score is partially determined by credit utilization, and transferring significant amounts of money to a card and then paying it off involves high credit utilization on that card. This will likely harm your score.

If you decide to pursue a balance transfer card to pay off debt, be sure to investigate the card’s APR following the introductory period. Your interest rate may take you by surprise and skyrocket if you don’t do your due diligence.

The average length of a 0% APR introductory period is around 12 months for balance transfers. Source: WalletHub

Personal loan

Another popular debt consolidation method is taking out a personal line of credit. These loans are available at any time and can be used to quickly pay off debt.

If used correctly, personal loans can improve your credit score by diversifying your credit mix, especially if you’ve only had credit cards up until this point. Paying off debt with a loan rather than with credit can also reduce your credit utilization, which may boost your score.

That said, it’s important to remember that this process involves taking out a loan that must be paid back on time. You may also want to reconsider this option if your present score doesn’t allow you to take out a personal loan without being charged a high interest rate.

Borrowing from a 401(k)

If you have a 401(k) retirement account, you can borrow up to half of this balance to pay off debt. While it must be paid back within five years to avoid penalties, borrowing from a 401(k) does not have any adverse effects on your credit score. Moreover, the money you borrow doesn’t accumulate interest since 401(k) funds aren’t borrowed from a lender.

However, it’s important to remember what a 401(k) is meant for—retirement. Taking out funds for short-term debt payments can significantly detract from your retirement savings. You may also have to deal with tax repercussions when taking this course of action.

Nearly one-third of Americans with retirement accounts have borrowed from those accounts in the form of a loan. Source: SHRM

Home equity loan or line of credit

Home equity loans or lines of credit are perhaps the riskiest forms of debt consolidation, but they also offer some significant benefits. Essentially, lenders will offer you a loan and use your home as collateral. This means that if you fail to pay off the loan within the amount of time agreed upon, you could lose your home.

You must have excellent credit to take out a home equity loan or line of credit. When you apply, you will be hit with a credit check, which could initially lower your score a bit. While the impact on your score will likely be relatively insignificant, these loans can also accumulate very high interest, so it’s important to use discretion before taking one out to pay off debt.

Other options to consider

If debt consolidation doesn’t feel right for you, that’s okay. There are other debt relief options that could help restore your peace of mind regarding your financial situation.

Debt management program

Debt management services can help by counseling you regarding your options when you’re struggling with debt. A debt management program will likely involve a counselor negotiating lower interest with creditors and potentially closing credit cards.

While visiting a counselor at a debt management agency doesn’t harm your credit score at all, entering into a debt management program that reduces how much you have to pay does usually negatively impact your score. Your credit report will likely reflect the debt management program in effect until you are no longer using it.

Debt settlement or bankruptcy

Debt settlement is the process of negotiating with creditors to pay significantly less money than you owe to have your debt forgiven. Bankruptcy is a legal process that helps people organize and sometimes eliminate their debt. Bankruptcy, however, is a more long-term option than the other ones we’ve mentioned.

These two options should be a last resort when struggling to pay off debt, as they can have a significantly adverse effect on your credit score. Both debt settlement and bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for upwards of seven years, and sometimes up to ten years, negatively impacting your ability to open new accounts or apply for a loan. However, if you need to take care of massive debt now and you take wise financial steps in the future, these processes could end up ultimately being the right solution for you.

Should I consolidate my debt?

Before pursuing debt consolidation, it’s important to take a comprehensive look at the reasons you’re interested in consolidating debt and your plans for the foreseeable future.

Do you have a high interest rate?

If the interest on the debt you owe is 20 percent or more, you’ll likely save money by consolidating debt. However, certain balance transfer options charge fees that may counteract the benefits of debt consolidation. Do your research ahead of time to figure out which option saves you more money.

Are you missing payments?

Keeping track of all of your accounts can be stressful. If remembering to pay your bills has been a struggle and you’ve found yourself repeatedly missing payments, debt consolidation may help. Consolidating your debt could simplify your financial life by allowing you to take care of all payments at once. This will also benefit your credit in the long run, since missed and late payments can be detrimental to your score.

Do you need excellent credit in the short term?

If you’re planning to take out a loan or a mortgage anytime soon, you may feel the need to safeguard your credit score at all costs. Since many debt consolidation methods will put a temporary dent in your score, it may be wise to hold off until after you’ve been approved by a lender.

Ultimately, whether you decide to pursue debt consolidation and which method you choose depends on the weight of your debts and what would benefit your credit most. If you’re still on the fence, it’s a good idea to consult a financial advisor before making any decisions that could have long-lasting consequences.

Whichever decision you make, remember to keep your credit health at the forefront of your mind, and to take the steps where needed to repair your credit to expand your financial opportunities.


Reviewed by Cynthia Thaxton, Chief Compliance Officer. Written by Lexington Law.

Cynthia Thaxton has been with Lexington Law Firm since 2014. She attended The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia where she graduated summa cum laude with a degree in International Relations and a minor in Arabic. Cynthia then attended law school at George Mason University School of Law, where she served as Senior Articles Editor of the George Mason Law Review and graduated cum laude. Cynthia is licensed to practice law in Utah, North Carolina and Virginia.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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