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USAA Car Insurance vs. Progressive Car Insurance: Which Is Better in 2021?

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Car insurance companies aren’t all cut from the same cloth. There is a lot of variety out there, both in terms of policy cost and customer service. Which car insurance companies lead the pack? We wanted to find out, so we took a look at nine of the industry’s largest insurance carriers to see how they compared with each other. In this head-to-head comparison, we’ll focus specifically on just two carriers within our study of nine major auto insurance companies: USAA and Progressive.

Landing in first place overall among the nine insurance companies we studied, USAA is the number one choice to consider if you’re looking for car insurance, assuming you qualify for coverage with this provider. Progressive lands in the bottom half in our study.  

Let’s take a more in-depth look at how these two companies stack up, both in terms of how their customers rate their satisfaction with the companies and by the companies’ rates for a variety of demographic groups.

Customer Satisfaction

USAA

U.S. News Overall Rating

Progressive

U.S. News Overall Rating

In our overall rankings, USAA lands in first place. Still, keep in mind that this company’s membership requirements result in a limited audience. A military affiliation is necessary if you want to qualify for coverage with USAA. 

What about Progressive? That company lands in seventh place overall on our list. 

With car insurance, customer service can have a big impact on the experience you have with your carrier. There’s no contest between USAA and Progressive here, as USAA is the clear winner.

And let’s not forget about claims handling. A company that handles claims promptly and diligently can make your life a whole lot easier if you have an accident. USAA gets the nod over Progressive in this vital area. 

USAA’s clients shared comments that express just how pleased they are with the value and service that this leading insurance carrier provides. “USAA is awesome,” raved one customer. “We’ve had USAA for almost 40 years; the company is responsive and forgiving,” said another. 

Some of Progressive’s clients expressed satisfaction with the service provided. “Quick, friendly, professional,” said one. “They were very prompt in communicating with me,” said another. 

But others were displeased with the service they received.  “Progressive did not pay my claim and gave me a lot of runaround when I tried to find out why,” said one client. “They held us up by delaying the payment,” said another. 

Read our full USAA review »

Read our full Progressive review »

USAA vs. Progressive: Pros & Cons

USAA

    • Nabs a first-place ranking overall among all the auto insurance companies we researched

    • Lower rates than any other company in our study

    • Only available to those with a military affiliation

Progressive

    • Rate for drivers with a DUI is lower than the industry average

    • Low ranking for customer service

    • Low ranking for claims handling

Which Is Cheapest?

With an average rate of $875, USAA leads the pack in affordability; of the nine companies we studied, USAA was the least expensive. Progressive’s average rate of $1,334 earned it a sixth-place ranking. That rate makes Progressive a whopping 52% more expensive than USAA.   

Looking for a low car insurance rate? In the area of pricing, USAA outperforms Progressive by a notable margin.  

Now it’s time to take a look at how USAA and Progressive compare to the industry average when it comes to price. Our data puts the industry average at $1,321. Progressive’s rate is 1% higher than this average. At USAA, the rate is 34% lower than the average rate among the nine companies we studied.  

Remember that in this section of our Progressive and USAA comparison, we’re focused squarely on cost. However, our recommendation is that you take a broader view when shopping for car insurance; there’s more to selecting an ideal carrier than simply choosing the one that’s least expensive. Take a close look at critical areas such as customer service and claims handling when making your decision. 

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Which Is Cheapest for Men?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

25-year-old male

$1,635

$1,086

$1,554

35-year-old male

$1,237

$810

$1,278

60-year-old male

$1,126

$756

$1,183

Age is the ultimate teacher. This is certainly true when it comes to a person’s driving skills; research shows that older drivers tend to have safer driving habits than those who are younger. Insurance companies heed this fact by charging younger drivers higher rates. As drivers advance in age, their car insurance rates tend to decrease. 

According to our study, at Progressive and USAA, age has a clear impact on the cost of insurance. Among male drivers, both companies charge the highest rates to 25-year-olds. Rates decrease a bit for 35-year-old drivers. And among male drivers, 60-year-olds receive the lowest rates. 

So, how does Progressive compare with USAA among males drivers in the three age groups we considered? Our study shows that in all three age categories, USAA’s rates are much lower than Progressive’s. For the 25-year-old male driver, the rate charged by USAA is 34% lower than Progressive’s rate. With 35-year-old males, the rate charged by USAA is 35% lower than Progressive’s rate. And with 60-year-old males, the rate charged by USAA is 33% lower than the rate charged by Progressive. 

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles for men in each of the following ages: 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles have a clean driving record, 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. We used three vehicles for our driver profiles: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest for Women?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

25-year-old female

$1,605

$1,033

$1,487

35-year-old female

$1302

$812

$1,274

60-year-old female

$1,101

$755

$1,149

 How do these companies compete when it comes to female drivers? Let’s take a look at rates charged by Progressive and USAA for three groups of female drivers: 25-year-olds, 35-year-olds, and 60-year-olds. 

USAA’s rates for women are much lower than Progressive’s among all three age groups. For 25-year-old females, USAA’s rate was 36% lower than Progressive’s. With 35-year-old female drivers, USAA’s rate was lower by 38%. Finally, with 60-year-old females, USAA again had the price advantage. Its rates were 31% lower than Progressive’s.   

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles for women in each of the following ages: 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles have a clean driving record, 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. We used three vehicles for our driver profiles: the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest for High Mileage?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

12,000 miles annually

$1,334

$875

$1,321

Insurance costs often increase with mileage. All other things being equal, someone who drives a lot of miles each year will likely pay a higher rate than someone who puts only a few miles on the odometer. 

We wanted to learn more about the impact mileage has on car insurance. To acquire some insights, we evaluated two groups: one puts 6,000 miles on the odometer each year, while the other logs 12,000 miles over the same time period.

Let’s begin with the driver who puts 12,000 miles on the odometer annually. USAA’s rate is significantly more affordable than Progressive’s here. With USAA, the monthly rate is 34% less expensive than Progressive’s rate. 

What happens when you consider the industry average? Progressive’s rate is 1% higher than the industry average, while USAA’s rate undercuts the average by a staggering 34%.  

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with high mileage (12,000 miles per year). The profiles covered men and women in the 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old age groups with a medium level of insurance coverage, a good credit score, and a clean driving record. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest for Low Mileage?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

6,000 miles annually

$1,330

$819

$1,278

Yes, you can save money on car insurance by driving fewer miles. However, our research shows that the savings are minimal. 

Let’s start with Progressive, whose drivers who put 6,000 miles on the odometer each year pay just 0.3% less than those who drove 12,000 miles annually, which is a negligible difference. What about USAA? Here, drivers in the group with lower mileage pay just 6% less than those in the group that put more miles on the odometer.

Between Progressive and USAA, USAA was easily the more affordable choice for drivers who put 6,000 miles on the odometer each year. Progressive’s rate for these drivers comes in at $1,330; USAA charges $819. That means USAA’s rate is 38% less expensive than Progressive’s for drivers whose mileage places them in this category.  

You may be wondering how these rates compare to the industry average for drivers in this mileage group. Progressive’s rate is 4% higher than the industry average. USAA’s rate is 36% lower than the average we arrived at during our research.  

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with low mileage (6,000 miles per year). The profiles covered men and women in the 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old age groups with a medium level of insurance coverage, a good credit score, and a clean driving record. The vehicles used in our study were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Learn more about low mileage car insurance »

Which Is Cheapest for Good Credit?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

Good credit

$1,324

$860

$1,311

Your credit history can affect the rate you pay for car insurance. Those with the best credit scores tend to pay the lowest rates, all other things being equal.

According to our study, drivers with good credit who are insured with Progressive pay an average rate of $1,324. At USAA, drivers with good credit pay an average rate of just $860. That data shows that USAA is 35% less expensive than Progressive for drivers in this category. 

How do these figures look next to the industry average? In comparison to the industry average for drivers with good credit, Progressive’s rate is 1% higher. USAA’s rate undercuts the industry average by 34%. 

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with good credit. We used men and women aged 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles have a clean driving record, a medium level of insurance coverage, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 are the vehicles used in our analysis. 

Which Is Cheapest for Bad Credit?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

Bad credit

$2,299

$1,602

$2,227

Just as good credit can help you get a lower car insurance rate, so too can bad credit cause your rates to spike. Data gathered by insurance companies indicates that those with poor credit are more likely to file insurance claims. This makes these customers a higher risk for insurance companies, and that risk triggers higher rates.  

If you’re a driver with bad credit, our research indicates that USAA is a lot less expensive than Progressive. Progressive has a rate of $2,299, while USAA charges $1,602. Those numbers show that USAA’s rate is 30% less expensive than Progressive’s. 

How do these rates compare with the industry average for drivers with bad credit? Progressive’s rate is 3% higher than the average. USAA’s rate is 28% lower than the industry average. 

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with poor credit. We used men and women aged 25 years, 35 years, and 60 years. The profiles have a clean driving record, a medium level of insurance coverage, and 12,000 miles of annual driving. The 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150 are the vehicles used in our analysis. 

Which Is Cheapest for Good Drivers?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

Clean record

$1,334

$875

$1,321

Do you have a clean driving record, with no tickets, accidents, or DUIs? If so, data indicates drivers like you tend to qualify for lower car insurance rates. Research shows that drivers with a clean record are less likely than others to file a claim. Insurance companies take note of this, and charge these drivers lower rates as a result. It’s a great incentive for remaining careful and aware when you’re behind the wheel. 

For drivers with a clean record, USAA charges lower rates than Progressive. How much lower? Our study revealed that USAA’s rate for good drivers is 34% less expensive than the average rate charged by Progressive. And, while Progressive’s rate was about 1% higher than the industry average, USAA’s rate undercut the industry average by 34%.

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with a clean record. These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old men and women with 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest After a Speeding Ticket?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

With 1 speeding violation

$1,759

$1,049

$1,604

If you want to wildly inflate your car insurance premium, get a speeding ticket. Just one ticket can have a major effect on your rate. To keep your monthly car insurance costs down, be mindful of legal speed limits. 

In our research, USAA’s rate for a driver with one speeding ticket is $1,049; Progressive’s rate stands at $1,759. That means USAA’s rate is 40% less expensive than Progressive’s for drivers in this group. 

Now it’s time to take a look at how these numbers compare with the industry average for drivers with a single speeding ticket. Progressive’s rate is 10% higher than the industry average. USAA’s rate is 35% lower than the industry average. 

At Progressive, a driver with one speeding violation pays a rate that’s 32% higher than the rate paid by a driver with a clean record. And at USAA, a speeding ticket can account for an increase of 20% over the rate paid by a driver with a clean record. 

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with one speeding violation. These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old men and women with 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest After an Accident?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

With 1 accident

$2,237

$1,220

$1,872

All it takes is a single car accident to ramp up your auto insurance bill. 

For drivers with an accident on their record, USAA is a more affordable choice than Progressive. USAA’s rate for drivers with a single accident is $1,220; Progressive’s rate is $2,237. That makes USAA 45% less expensive than Progressive for drivers in this category. 

How do these numbers stack up against the industry average for drivers with one accident?  For these drivers, Progressive’s rate is 19% higher than the industry average. At USAA, the rate is 35% lower than the industry average.

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with one accident. These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old men and women with 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Which Is Cheapest After a DUI?

 

Progressive

USAA

Industry Average

With 1 DUI

$1,733

$1,661

$2,112

 A DUI can have a big impact on the amount you pay in car insurance. 

According to our research, USAA is less expensive than Progressive for drivers with a DUI. USAA charges a rate of $1,661 to a driver with a DUI; at Progressive, these drivers pay $1,733. That means USAA is 4% less expensive than Progressive for those who have a DUI on their driving record. 

Both companies charge rates that are lower than the industry average for drivers with a single DUI. Progressive’s rate is 18% lower than the industry average. USAA’s rate is 21% lower than the average. 

To find these average rates, we created driver profiles with one driving under the influence (DUI) conviction. These driving record representative profiles were based on 25-, 35-, and 60-year-old men and women with 12,000 miles of driving per year, a medium level of insurance coverage, and a good credit score. Vehicles used in the analysis were the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150. 

Discounts

If you’re interested in netting the biggest savings on your car insurance, you need to look into discounts. Insurance companies provide a wide range of discounts, and the breadth and range of their offerings may surprise you. 

One thing to remember, though, is that discounts vary from one company to the next. This means you’ll need to compare opportunities if you want to maximize your savings. 

In our study, we evaluated customer satisfaction among two groups: those who had filed a claim and those who hadn’t. With both groups, USAA scored higher marks than Progressive for satisfaction with policy discounts.  

About 62% of USAA customers who hadn’t made a claim expressed complete satisfaction with the discounts offered. Among customers who had filed a claim, this number rose to 63%.

Now let’s take a look at Progressive. Roughly 42% of drivers with no claims expressed complete satisfaction with Progressive’s discounts. And 33% of Progressive clients who’d filed a claim expressed complete satisfaction with the company’s discounts. 

Ever heard of a tracking discount? It can help reduce your monthly car insurance costs if you minimize your mileage and drive safely. 

USAA’s tracking discount is called SafePilot. This discount plan uses a smartphone app to keep track of your driving behaviors. With SafePilot, you can earn up to a 10% discount immediately upon enrolling. At renewal, you have the chance to earn additional savings; with safe driving habits, you could earn up to 30% discount.

Over at Progressive, the tracking discount is called Snapshot. As with USAA’s program, it requires you to download an app to your smartphone. The app keeps track of your driving habits, and you’re rewarded for safe driving. Progressive says that drivers who save with Snapshot save an average of $145 per year. 

What do Progressive’s customers think about the company’s discounts? Let’s take a look:

  • “If there are discounts offered, they don’t mention them to me.”

  • “They have not offered any relief even though I drive 20k less since March.”

  •  “You have to know to ask for some discounts – they are not necessarily offered.”

USAA’s customers shared these thoughts regarding that company’s discounts: 

  • “Bundling is easier.”

  • “I bundle other insurance products with the same company allowing for additional discounts.” 

  • “Great discounts for good driving habits.”

Keep in mind that discounts can vary from state to state. If you want to know if a discount is offered in your area, it’s best to check directly with your insurance carrier.

Discounts

USAA

Progressive

Customer Loyalty

Yes

Yes

Student/Good Student

Yes

Yes

Student Away From Home/Storage

Yes

Yes

Bundling/Multi-policy

Yes

Yes

Multi-vehicle

Yes

Yes

Good Driver

Yes

Yes

Defensive Driving Course

Yes

Yes

Employer/Affinity Group

No

No

Teacher

No

No

Military

Yes

No

New Car/Safety/Anti-theft Equipment

Yes

No

Low Mileage

Yes

No

Paperless/Online Billing

No

Yes

Auto-pay/Pay-up-front

Yes

Yes

Tracking Device Program

Yes

Yes

How We Did This Comparison

At U.S. News, we’re all about helping people make life’s important decisions. Our college rankings, launched in 1983, set the standard in educational rankings. Our rankings in other fields, like healthcare, government, and the automotive sphere, help people and thought leaders make choices that make lives better. Now we’re continuing to empower you with the information you need to make the right choices for your life with our Best Car Insurance Rankings. 

We surveyed 4,806 consumers who filed a car insurance claim or started a new auto insurance policy in the last five years, asking questions about their car insurance company. Of the survey respondents, 252 filed a claim with USAA and 141 started a policy with USAA, while 177 filed a claim with Progressive and 316 started a policy with Progressive. These questions covered satisfaction with the ease of filing a claim, customer service, claim status communication, claim resolution, and overall value. In general, questions for consumers who have filed a claim were given more weight than questions for consumers who have only opened a policy. We also asked whether they’d recommend the company and if they planned to renew their policy. We used their responses to build our Best Car Insurance Companies Rankings, as well as our subrankings for best customer service, claims handling, and customer loyalty, and this head-to-head comparison.

Our Study Rates

To get comparative insurance rates for this study, U.S. News also worked with Quadrant Information Services to analyze a report of insurance rates in all 50 states from most of the largest national car insurance companies, though not every company operates in every state.  Quadrant obtained publicly available rate data that car insurers file with state regulators. Our study rates are based on profiles for both male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60. Vehicles used include the 2015 Honda Civic, 2015 Toyota RAV4, and 2015 Ford F-150, with annual mileage ranging from 6,000 and 12,000. Three car insurance coverage levels were used, as were credit tiers of good, fair, and poor. Clean driving records and records with one accident, one speeding violation, and one DUI were also used in the calculations of certain driver archetypes. 

To get the study rates shown here, we computed the mean rate for male and female drivers aged 25, 35, and 60 who drive 12,000 miles per year and have medium coverage, good credit, and a clean driving record. The rates shown here are for comparative purposes only and should not be considered “average” rates available by individual insurers. Because car insurance rates are based on individual factors, your car insurance rates will differ from the rates shown here.

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Are Sallie Mae Student Loans Federal or Private?

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When you hear the name Sallie Mae, you probably think of student loans. There’s a good reason for that; Sallie Mae has a long history, during which time it has provided both federal and private student loans.

However, as of 2014, all of Sallie Mae’s student loans are private, and its federal loans have been sold to another servicer. Here’s what to know if you have a Sallie Mae loan or are considering taking one out.

What is Sallie Mae?

Sallie Mae is a company that currently offers private student loans. But it has taken a few forms over the years.

In 1972, Congress first created the Student Loan Marketing Association (SLMA) as a private, for-profit corporation. Congress gave SLMA, commonly called “Sallie Mae,” the status of a government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) to support the company in its mission to provide stability and liquidity to the student loan market as a warehouse for student loans.

However, in 2004, the structure and purpose of the company began to change. SLMA dissolved in late December of that year, and the SLM Corporation, or “Sallie Mae,” was formed in its place as a fully private-sector company without GSE status.

In 2014, the company underwent another big adjustment when Sallie Mae split to form Navient and Sallie Mae. Navient is a federal student loan servicer that manages existing student loan accounts. Meanwhile, Sallie Mae continues to offer private student loans and other financial products to consumers. If you took out a student loan with Sallie Mae prior to 2014, there’s a chance that it was a federal student loan under the now-defunct Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP).

At present, Sallie Mae owns 1.4 percent of student loans in the United States. In addition to private student loans, the bank also offers credit cards, personal loans and savings accounts to its customers, many of whom are college students.

What is the difference between private and federal student loans?

When you’re seeking financing to pay for college, you’ll have a big choice to make: federal versus private student loans. Both types of loans offer some benefits and drawbacks.

Federal student loans are educational loans that come from the U.S. government. Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program, there are four types of federal student loans available to qualified borrowers.

With federal student loans, you typically do not need a co-signer or even a credit check. The loans also come with numerous benefits, such as the ability to adjust your repayment plan based on your income. You may also be able to pause payments with a forbearance or deferment and perhaps even qualify for some level of student loan forgiveness.

On the negative side, most federal student loans feature borrowing limits, so you might need to find supplemental funding or scholarships if your educational costs exceed federal loan maximums.

Private student loans are educational loans you can access from private lenders, such as banks, credit unions and online lenders. On the plus side, private student loans often feature higher loan amounts than you can access through federal funding. And if you or your co-signer has excellent credit, you may be able to secure a competitive interest rate as well.

As for drawbacks, private student loans don’t offer the valuable benefits that federal student borrowers can enjoy. You may also face higher interest rates or have a harder time qualifying for financing if you have bad credit.

Are Sallie Mae loans better than federal student loans?

In general, federal loans are the best first choice for student borrowers. Federal student loans offer numerous benefits that private loans do not. You’ll generally want to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and review federal funding options before applying for any type of private student loan — Sallie Mae loans included.

However, private student loans, like those offered by Sallie Mae, do have their place. In some cases, federal student aid, grants, scholarships, work-study programs and savings might not be enough to cover educational expenses. In these situations, private student loans may provide you with another way to pay for college.

If you do need to take out private student loans, Sallie Mae is a lender worth considering. It offers loans for a variety of needs, including undergrad, MBA school, medical school, dental school and law school. Its loans also feature 100 percent coverage, so you can find funding for all of your certified school expenses.

With that said, it’s always best to compare a few lenders before committing. All lenders evaluate income and credit score differently, so it’s possible that another lender could give you lower interest rates or more favorable terms.

The bottom line

Sallie Mae may be a good choice if you’re in the market for private student loans and other financial products. Just be sure to do your research upfront, as you should before you take out any form of financing. Comparing multiple offers always gives you the best chance of saving money.

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Tips to do some fall cleaning on your finances

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Wealth manager, Harry Abrahamsen, has five simple ways to stay on top of the big financial picture.

PORTLAND, Maine — Keeping track of our financial stability is something we can all do, whether we have IRAs or 401ks or just a checking account. Harry J. Abrahamsen is the Founder of Abrahamsen Financial Group. He works with clients to create and grow their own wealth. Abrahamsen shares five financial tips, starting with knowing what you have. 

1. Analyze Your Finances Quarterly or Biannually

You want to make sure that your long-term strategy is congruent with your short-term strategy. If the short-term is not working out, you may need to adjust what you are doing to make sure your outcome produces the desired results you are looking to accomplish. It is just like setting sail on a voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. You know where you want to go and plot your course, but there are many factors that need to be considered to actually get you across and across safely. Your finances behave the exact same way. Check your current situation and make sure you are taking into consideration all of the various wealth-eroding factors that can take you completely off course.

With interest rates very low, now might be a good time to consider refinancing student loans or mortgages, or consolidating credit card debt. However, do so only if you need to or if you can create a positive cash flow. To ensure that you are saving the most by doing so, you must look at current payments, excluding taxes and insurance costs. This way you can do an apples-to-apples comparison.

The most important things to look for when reviewing your credit report is accuracy. Make sure the reporting agencies are reporting things actuary. If it doesn’t appear to be reporting correct and accurate information, you should consult with a reputable credit repair company to help you fix the incorrect information.

4. Savings and Retirement Accounts

The most important thing to consider when reviewing your savings and retirement accounts is to make sure the strategies match your short-term and long-term investment objectives. All too often people end up making decisions one at a time, at different times in their lives, with different people, under different circumstances. Having a sound strategy in place will allow you to view your finances with a macro-economic lens vs a micro-economic view. Stay the course and adjust accordingly from a risk and tax standpoint.

RELATED: Financial lessons learned through the pandemic

A great tip for lowering utility bills or car insurance premiums: Simply ask! There may be things you are not aware of that could save you hundreds of dollars every month. You just need to call all of the companies that you do business with to find out about cost-cutting strategies. 

RELATED: Overcome your fear of finances

To learn more about Abrahamsen Financial, click here

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How to Get a Loan Even with Bad Credit

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Sana pwedeng mabura ang bad credit history as quickly and easily as paying off your utility bills, ‘no? Unfortunately, it takes time. And bago mo pa maayos ang bad credit mo, more often than not, kailangan mo na namang mag-avail ng panibagong loan. 

Good thing you can still get a loan even with bad credit, kahit na medyo limited ang options. How do you get a loan if you have bad credit? Alamin sa short guide na ito. 

For more finance tips, visit Moneymax.

 

 

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