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The Top 10 Morning Routines by Highly Successful Entrepreneurs

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NEW YORK CITY, NY / ACCESSWIRE / January 11, 2020 / Now that 2020 has started, everyone is talking about how to be more productive, make more money, and be happier in the process.

There’s no question that people need to improve in various areas of their lives in order to be successful but if there is one thing in particular that is key in order to meet your goals for 2020, it is the importance of having a powerful morning routine.

The morning is the most important time of the day because it’s the time when you get up and get ready for whatever comes next. This is why it is crucial to have an energetic, efficient and powerful morning routine.

This year, VIP Media Group put together a list of what they consider to be some of the top morning routines by some of the top entrepreneurs and business leaders of our time.

Grant Cardone

Serial Entrepreneur Grant Cardone makes sure to beat the sun each morning and begins to write his goals for the day. Soon thereafter, Grant makes sure to do a series of workouts that give him the energy he needs to take on the day. After taking a shower, eating a good breakfast, and listening to music while driving to work, he gets in the perfect mental state to 10X his day and win the day.

Tai Lopez

When it comes to having an amazing morning routine, Tai Lopez is a huge believer in ‘chunking’ your morning routine (and day) into small pieces. By dividing his morning into smaller chunks, Tai is able to be flexible with his routine but at the same time execute at high levels.

According to Tai Lopez, “when you break a routine that you have in your mind as unbreakable, it makes it very easy to break it again, and the next thing you know, you’re not following it at all. So I have found that ‘chunking’ your day is key to avoid getting discouraged and it allows you to accomplish your goals more effectively.”

Jason Stone

Serial Entrepreneur Jason Stone begins his day by spending a few minutes stretching. Through the years, Jason has come to understand that stretching reduces muscular tension, enhances muscular relaxation, and improves mechanical efficiency and overall functional performance. In addition, shortly after stretching and waking up, Jason drinks plenty of water, takes morning vitamins, makes his bed, and meditates for at least 5-10 minutes to keep calm the entire day. After making some tea or coffee, Jason gets ready to check his to do, go to the gym, and gets ready to own the day.

Alex Miller

Everyday when Alex Miller wakes up he has to get ready for war. His morning routine starts off with a string of high powered spiritual prayers and Christian devotionals. Besides having to fight his way up to reach his personal sales quota and honing his skills to deal with customer service issues and other outside forces, the main battle he fights is with himself. The solution to his problems is practicing acceptance. And when Alex is finished reading, he spends some quality time with his wife because even when they built Alex Miller Credit Repair together and they work together side by side they can go days and sometimes weeks without real quality time, making their morning routine vital for their marriage.

Cory Jean

Business coach Cory Jean wakes up every day at 5:30 AM. He believes that there is a huge correlation between waking up early early and increased success. Then he heads to the gym and works out for 45 minutes, before going back home to get ready and go to work. At 8:00 AM he is at work and ready to take on the day. For Cory, having a set routine that holds him accountable to begin the process of discipline is extremely important. Cory believes that when someone makes the sacrifice to get out of their warm bed and head to the gym they are already telling themselves that they are here to win and win big!

Mike Murphy

Serial entrepreneur Mike Murphy has an extended morning routine of ten steps that starts as soon as the alarm goes off. First, he stays in bed for five minutes doing a gratitude exercise where he thanks God and the universe for his blessings. Second, he does the “Still Waters Run Deep” step where he gets on a Yoga mat. Third, he does Muscle Activation Therapy (M.A.T) stretches. Fourth, he does what he calls “Dirt Dive of the Day” round one where he goes over his daily schedule. Fifth, he does warrior yoga poses. Sixth, he does the second round of Dirt Dive where he thinks about any other thing that needs to be accomplished that day. Seventh, he prays and reads his daily devotional. Eighth, he showers. Then he gets to work and does his third round of Dirt Dive this time with his assistant, going over and adjusting his schedule. Lastly, he says “good morning” to all his direct reports and goes on to execute the day.

Alex Nekritin

Alex Nekritin, the CEO and founder of Ultiself the breakthrough self improvement app, believes that performing a morning routine is essential to achieving success. Before getting out of bed, he thinks of three things that he is grateful for. Then he drinks two or three glasses of water with lime and goes to his patio barefoot and shirtless to stretch for 5-10 minutes in the sun. Afterwards he meditates and does breathing exercises before taking a tablespoon of coconut oil, olive oil, a teaspoon of Bulletproof MCT or brain octane oil. Then depending on the day he walks to the gym or starts working right away.

Christian J Smith “Mr. Frost”

Young trader, Christian J. Smith “Mr Frost“, thinks that morning routines are essential because it enhances discipline and because it is important to stay focused on the bigger picture. Mr. Frost wakes up at 5AM in the morning and drinks one to two pints of water with a banana to kickstart his brain and get energy. Then he turns off all his phone notifications and eliminates everything but what is necessary for him to perform as a trader. In the morning, he makes an effort not to check emails or messages right away, and not to go on social media. Instead, he completely isolates himself from the world and enters what he calls “Monk Mode,” which is the key to massive focus and productivity. Mr. Frost makes a clear list of objectives with no more than four tasks, whether they relate to health, relationships or business, that help him “move the needle” in his life.

Julia Ellighausen

Julia Ellighausen, the Co-Founder of Ninjacators LLC, a trading technology company, wakes up every at 5AM. Shortly after waking up, Julia starts a 30 minute workout on a cross trainer while listening to audiobooks of all sorts. After a shower, she starts planning her day and writes what the envisions her day to be, while focusing on the most important goal she must accomplish that day.

Andrew Evans

Andrew Evans, the owner of Miami Spartans, the #1 sales office in the country, believes that how we do one thing is how we do everything, which is why morning routines are very important. The first step for him is to wake up on time and with energy, which has to do with what he does before bed and after he wakes up. For example, he makes sure his phone is plugged in on the other side of the room so that he must get out of bed when the alarm goes off because it is harder to hit the snooze button. Then he chugs down a bottle of water and brushes his teeth before working out for about 45 minutes. Andrew then heads to the sauna to detox and begin his 10 minutes meditation and visualization routine. Finally, he gets back home, starts a hot shower and ends the last 2-3 minutes with cold water. He gets dressed, drinks a protein-heavy shake and multivitamins, and is ready to go on with his day!

Contact Information:

Paula Henderson
202-539-7664
phendersonnews@gmail.com

About VIP Media Group
VIP Media Group is a hybrid PR agency. Their diverse client base includes top class entrepreneurs, public figures, influencers, and celebrities.

SOURCE: VIP-Media

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California’s vague new financial regulation law

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California Capitol. Photo by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters

In summary

California has a new financial regulation law but its reach is vague and awaits more definition.

Assembly Bill 1864 didn’t get much media or public attention as it zipped through both houses of the Legislature on the last day of the 2020 session.

Superficially, it appeared merely to reconfigure the state’s financial regulatory agencies into a new entity called the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation.

However, those in California’s vast financial industry were paying lots of attention because the bill creates an entirely new regulatory regime with broad powers, including fines of up to $1 million a day, to police financial players that hitherto have had little oversight.

The official rationale for the legislation is that President Donald Trump’s administration neutered the federal Dodd-Frank Wall Street Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, so the state must step in with an equivalent to guard against predatory financial practices that harm consumers.

The new California Consumer Financial Protection Law gives the reconstituted agency authority to go after “abusive practices” whose definition in the law is fairly vague. Thus, the agency itself will define the term as it also decides which businesses will face its scrutiny.

It appears that the new law will affect firms involved in debt settlement, credit repair, check cashing, rent-to-own contracts, payday lending, student loan servicing and financing for retail sales. However, its primary target seems to be financial services offered by non-banks, particularly what are called “fintech companies” that offer bank-like services via the Internet without maintaining physical offices.

Fintechs, many of them based in the San Francisco Bay Area, have blossomed in recent years as part of the digital economy, competing with traditional brick-and-mortar banks. Their disruptive nature is not unlike the challenge that technology-based ride services such as Uber and Lyft pose to taxicabs and buses.

Late-blooming changes in AB 1864 exempted traditional financial firms that are already regulated, such as banks and credit unions, from the new consumer protection law, leading some analysts to conclude that its unstated aim is to help them stave off competition from new kids on the financial block.

The vagueness of the new law was encapsulated in what Gov. Gavin Newsom said during a signing ceremony. The new law and the new department, he said, will “create conditions for innovation to flourish in a way where we can steward that and we can just work against its excesses. So we support risk-taking, not recklessness.”

Newsom also signed two other financial protection measures, one that requires debt collectors to be licensed beginning in 2022 and the other creating a Student Loan Borrower Bill of Rights.

Although the new state law is said to mirror the Dodd-Frank law, it contains at least one significant difference. When federal regulators levy fines for what they consider to be bad conduct, the money goes into the federal treasury. When state regulators impose their fines of up to $1 million a day, the money will be retained by the new agency to finance more activity.

Will that give the new agency a financial incentive to skip over minor consumer issues and go after big companies? It’s a question that only time will answer.

Significantly too, the new investigative and regulatory mechanism contained in AB 1864 specifically does not usurp the authority of the attorney general to also target companies under the state’s equally vague “unfair competition” law.

From its inception a decade ago, Dodd-Frank has attracted criticism from business executives for regulatory overkill. Will California’s new version be less controversial? We won’t know until the new agency puts some definitional meat on its bones.



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California’s vague new financial regulation law – Whittier Daily News

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Assembly Bill 1864 didn’t get much media or public attention as it zipped through both houses of the Legislature on the last day of the 2020 session.

Superficially, it appeared merely to reconfigure the state’s financial regulatory agencies into a new entity called the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation.

However, those in California’s vast financial industry were paying lots of attention because the bill creates an entirely new regulatory regime with broad powers, including fines of up to $1 million a day, to police financial players that hitherto have had little oversight.

The official rationale for the legislation is that President Donald Trump’s administration neutered the federal Dodd-Frank Wall Street Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010, so the state must step in with an equivalent to guard against predatory financial practices that harm consumers.

The new California Consumer Financial Protection Law gives the reconstituted agency authority to go after “abusive practices” whose definition in the law is fairly vague. Thus, the agency itself will define the term as it also decides which businesses will face its scrutiny.

It appears that the new law will affect firms involved in debt settlement, credit repair, check cashing, rent-to-own contracts, payday lending, student loan servicing and financing for retail sales. However, its primary target seems to be financial services offered by non-banks, particularly what are called “fintech companies” that offer bank-like services via the Internet without maintaining physical offices.

Fintechs, many of them based in the San Francisco Bay Area, have blossomed in recent years as part of the digital economy, competing with traditional brick-and-mortar banks. Their disruptive nature is not unlike the challenge that technology-based ride services such as Uber and Lyft pose to taxicabs and buses.

Late-blooming changes in AB 1864 exempted traditional financial firms that are already regulated, such as banks and credit unions, from the new consumer protection law, leading some analysts to conclude that its unstated aim is to help them stave off competition from new kids on the financial block.

The vagueness of the new law was encapsulated in what Gov. Gavin Newsom said during a signing ceremony. The new law and the new department, he said, will “create conditions for innovation to flourish in a way where we can steward that and we can just work against its excesses. So we support risk-taking, not recklessness.”

Newsom also signed two other financial protection measures, one that requires debt collectors to be licensed beginning in 2022 and the other creating a Student Loan Borrower Bill of Rights.

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397 people register to vote on deadline day at Duval Supervisor of Elections – 104.5 WOKV

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Monday, Oct. 5 at midnight, is the deadline to register to vote in Duval County.

But the Supervisor of Elections helped hundreds of people get registered today.

Robert Phillips, the chief elections officer of the Duval Supervisor of Elections, told Action News Jax’s Courtney Cole that 397 people came down to the Supervisor of Elections in downtown Jacksonville to get registered.

Supervisor of Elections staff assembled tents outside to allow people to register to vote without having to go through the COVID-19 prescreening necessary to enter the building.

“Again, 2020 has thrown us some challenges,” Phillips said.

There was even a little rain thrown into the mix today, but it didn’t stop folks from coming out.

“Out here, we have a lot of activity. We’ve been going since first thing this morning,” Phillips told Action News Jax.

There were people of all ages from all walks of life — some even registered for the very first time like Lemark Jamison.

Monday, Oct. 5, is a day he will always remember.

“It feels awesome, you know? It feels awesome,” Jamison told Cole.

Today, Jamison had the opportunity to register to vote for the first time in Florida.

“I’ve worked for voter registration companies. I’ve done advocating for Amendment 4, but I was never able to vote because of my prior background. But now I can,” Jamison said.

Jamison, the owner of a tax and credit repair business, told Cole his prior felony conviction held him back in the past.

In November 2018, more than 60% of Floridians voted to restore voting rights to more than 1 million people who completed their sentences.

But several months later, legislation was passed that required them to pay all financial penalties, which means thousands lost the right as quickly as they gained it.

“I’ve been contributing to society. I’ve been able to have several businesses. And I pay taxes. But I haven’t been able to, when it comes to voting, whether in a local level or any type of legislature — I haven’t been able to vote,” Jamison said.

The 35-year-old told Cole even though his wife helped him fill out his voter registration form — to which he exclaimed, “Thank God for wives, right?” — he told Cole it was pretty easy.

Now, he has this advice to share with other people who may be in his shoes:

“Get out and vote. Take advantage of this opportunity, regardless of who you plan on voting for.”

Here’s a breakdown from the Supervisor of Elections of how the 397 people registered today:

-56% registered as Democrats.

-21% registered as Republicans.

-22% registered as nonparty affiliates.



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