Connect with us

Financial advice

Spring Wedding? Tips on Saving Money on Your Destination Wedding

Published

on

Are you planning for a spring wedding? You are not alone; many love birds like planning their destination wedding for this time of the year. Spring is that unique season of the year where love is in the air, flowers are blooming as plants are blossoming.

Unfortunately, a wedding budget can kill your dream of a spring wedding before it sees the light of day. The question is; can you still enjoy an awesome wedding on a tight budget? Indeed you can. Our tips on saving money on your destination wedding have got you covered.

Spring Destination Wedding

Choose a Resort Offering an All-Inclusive Bundle

All-inclusive wedding bundles will enable you to get a flat rate on your whole wedding package. In fact, they can save you hundreds and even thousands on your wedding if done right.

These bundles may include food, sporting activities, drinks, makeup services, spa services as well as other guest events. As for drinks, you can have any of the three below:

  • Cash bar
  • Open bar
  • Consumption bar

A consumption bar can help you strike a balance between your guests getting some free drinks and paying for extra ones. You can make the bar open to your guests but set a spending threshold or a time limit with the owner. If the guests hit the limit or reach the set time, it can then be converted to a cash bar. This will save you money.

Another advantage of wedding bundles is that costs involving decoration, parking, photo sessions, and transport are reduced since your location is the same.

Combine Your Wedding and Honeymoon

Some resorts will offer you incentives and discounts if you combine your wedding with your honeymoon. Having your destination wedding and your honeymoon in the same location will help you save on traveling and other costs

You should, however, visit the place prior to the wedding to make sure it is diverse and interesting enough for both occasions. Another way to save would be to pack travel-sized items that you will need for your honeymoon to avoid buying from vendors.

Slash your Guests List

Naturally, a destination wedding doesn’t attract hundreds of guests; this ultimately reduces the financial pressure that comes with your wedding. Still, if there is a way you can further slash the guest list, do it by all means. 

Select an Offseason Date For Your Wedding.

Offseason wedding dates attract low rates and costs charged on weddings by resorts. Find out places which offer discounts for weddings on certain dates. As good as it sounds to your pocket, it is important to make sure that the dates you choose for your wedding won’t lead to a low turnout.

Additionally, for wedding festivities, you can choose a weekday to ensure even as guests come they won’t be overstaying as they also need to get back to their commitments.

You can also save your wedding costs by scheduling your wedding for a less traditional time of day. If for example the ceremony is planned for a weekday afternoon, the venues will charge less as compared to a Saturday afternoon event. Your guests might even drink less.

Consider Local Lenders for Your Wedding Supplies

Not everything you need for your destination wedding can be found where you are going to wed. You may need additional items and services. Consider local vendors who can offer reasonable prices from the wedding location rather than bringing vendors from home.

If you come with your vendors you have to cater for their travel and accommodation costs. Furthermore, if they are bringing items with them to a different country, you will have to cover the shipping cost directly or they will be indirectly included when you get priced.

Make sure you get recommendations from family and friends about the best vendors from where you are going to wed. You can also use Google and social media to find good vendors in advance.

The Take-Away

Destination weddings are the trend nowadays; this doesn’t mean you need to break the bank to have one. With proper planning, flexibility, and any of the above tips that suit you, you can whisk your love away to say ‘I Do’ in a destination of your dreams.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Financial advice

Are “Buy Here Pay Here” Auto Loans Good for You?

Published

on

buy here pay here loans

When a person’s cash reserves are insufficient to cover the cost of a car purchase, many turn to auto loans. However, lenders who are financial institutions, such as banks, may check your credit report. This may cause concern if you have bad credit.

The good news is that BHPH (buy here, pay here) auto loans are now available. Through these loans, buyers with no credit or bad credit can obtain in-house financing from the dealership. However, it is critical to keep in mind that this type of auto financing comes at a hefty cost, possibly greater than the car’s actual value. Your interest rates will likely increase, and you may even be required to consent to be tracked.

Examining the Process

Purchase here and pay here Financing is a type of auto loan that is almost always used to purchase previously owned vehicles. This auto loan is provided directly by the dealership. This is distinct from when the dealership offers you a loan through a financial institution with which they have partnered, such as a local credit union. There, the dealership acts as a go-between for you and the credit union, saving you the trip. However, the dealership will almost certainly charge you a fee for loan processing.

On the other hand, a buy here, pay here loan is the car dealership’s own form of in-house financing. When you apply for a buy here, pay here auto loan, the dealership becomes your lienholder. They will determine your interest rate and payment schedule, the most common of which are biweekly or weekly payments.

The terms of the majority of loans are largely determined by your credit score. If you also have a higher credit score, your interest rate will be lower. This frequently results in a lower down payment. However, with buy here, pay here loans, there is no requirement for a credit check. This adds to the allure of these loans for those with poor credit. This, however, means that the auto dealer, who serves as the lender, in this case, will charge extremely high interest rates.

Down payments on vehicles purchased with BHPH loans may vary. They may charge extremely low or extremely high prices to entice customers. While the Federal Reserve regulates traditional lenders in terms of loan amounts, this is not the case with used car dealerships and lots. They may finance the vehicle for a higher price than it is worth, particularly if it is a pre-owned vehicle. Repossession benefits BHPH lots. They will repossess your vehicle if you fall behind on payments and resell it to buyers with poor credit.

Pros and Cons

Obtaining financing through buy here, pay here auto loans is significantly faster than the traditional loan process. This is because the dealership makes the decision immediately. As expected, the primary benefit of buy here, pay here auto loans is that they enable you to obtain financing for your vehicle that you may not be able to obtain elsewhere due to your low credit score. However, its primary disadvantage is its high price.

Continue Reading

Financial advice

The Debt Snowball Plan & How to Use it to get out of Debt

Published

on

Getting debt-free is never easy but something that many people want to accomplish. The typical approach that most people take when trying to pay off their debt is to try and pay off the debts with the most interest, or largest amounts, first. While, mathematically, this is a sound approach, it can often become frustrating and end in failure.

If you’ve struggled to stay consistent in your efforts to pay off your debt, you may want to consider using the Debt Snowball Plan. This approach has been shown to be effective as a means to pay off debt without losing momentum or leading to frustration.

How the Snowball Plan Works

Reaching your Debt-free Goals

When paying off your debt, rather than attempting to pay off the largest amounts first, you should first tackle the smaller debts. By paying off the smaller debts first, you will quickly see progress as you pay off the smaller amounts faster which will help encourage you to continue with your goals.

To start, make a list of all of your debts (minus your mortgage) and list them from highest amount to lowest. Next, each month make the minimum payment necessary for each debt except the very lowest. With your smallest debt amount, pay more than the minimum payment – as much as you can. Once you’ve paid off your smallest debt amount, take what you were paying on that debt and apply it to the monthly payment of your next largest debt amount while continuing to pay only the minimum on all other debts.

An example of this method could look like this:

  • Credit card 1: $500 at 14% with a monthly payment of $25.
  • Credit card 2: $1,000 at 18% with a monthly payment of $50
  • Car loan: $6,000 at 5% over 4 years with a monthly payment of $135.
  • Student loan: $15,000 at 5% over 10 years with a monthly payment of $159.

Using the Debt Snowball Plan, you would pay the minimum amount on each of your debts but by adding an extra $100 to your smallest credit card payment, you would pay it off in 4 months. Next, you would apply the $125 you were paying on the smallest credit card payment to the second credit card to a total of $175 per month. The second card will then be paid off in 5 months. Once the second card is paid off you can add the $175 to the car payment of $135 for a total of $310 to put toward your monthly car payment – paying it off in 15 months.

Continuing with this method on your student loans and you’ll be debt-free in just another 24 months’ time. This method will help you keep the momentum going and prevent you from becoming discouraged along the way.

For additional credit counseling and credit repair help, please call: (480) 478-4304

Source link

Continue Reading

Financial advice

What Are the Pros and Cons of Secured/Unsecured Debt?

Published

on

difference between secured and unsecured loans

Secured credit and unsecured credit are very different types of credit in terms of risk to consumers and lenders. According to a  leading credit expert, you need to understand the benefits and drawbacks of each type of credit. because they can affect your credit score.

What Exactly Is Secured Credit?

Secured credit is a type of credit that is secured by a physical asset as collateral. If a borrower defaults on this type of loan, the lender may take possession of the collateral to recoup the loss. A good and common example is an auto loan. In an auto loan arrangement, the vehicle also serves as the collateral. The lender does not transfer the title until you complete payment.

The same goes for a mortgage: The home is the collateral for the home loan.  In case of default, the loan is secured by your home, and the bank continues to “own” the home until you pay it off. In this case, failing to pay your mortgage may result in the bank foreclosing on your home, which means they will evict you and sell it to someone else.

Title loans and pawnshop loans are also examples of secured loans.

While the majority of credit cards are unsecured, secured credit cards are available for consumers who may be unable to qualify for unsecured credit cards due to poor credit or a lack of credit history. With a secured credit card, you make a security deposit that counts toward your credit limit and that the lender can keep if you are unable to make the required credit card payments.

What Exactly Is Unsecured Credit?

Unsecured credit is credit that does not have a physical asset as collateral, which means the lender cannot repossess an asset if you default on the debt.

Unsecured Credit Examples

A student loan is an example of an unsecured loan because there is no tangible asset that can be taken away if you do not repay your student loans. Student loans are used to pay for education, and the lender cannot, of course, “take back” the education you have already received.

Credit cards, with the exception of secured credit cards, are generally extensions of unsecured credit.

Your Credit Score and the Effects of Secured and Unsecured Debt
According to John, credit scoring models treat secured and unsecured accounts equally. Credit scores do not penalize or reward you based on whether your accounts are unsecured or secured.

Credit scores still treat different types of accounts differently due to other factors (for example, credit cards are treated differently than installment loans), but this factor does not play a role.

Use Secured Credit Cards With Caution
Consumers frequently use secured credit card accounts to establish credit or rebuild credit after having bad credit. This is an excellent credit-building strategy, but you should exercise caution when using your secured credit card.

Why? Because secured credit cards frequently have extremely low credit limits. That means that even with modest spending, you can quickly reach a high utilization ratio on the account. For example, if your secured credit card has a $500 credit limit and you have a $500 credit limit and you spend $250, you already have a 50% utilization ratio on that account.

Having heavily used credit card accounts can have a significant negative impact on your credit score, so if you want tscore, so if you want to keep your credit score as high as possible, you’ll want to keep an eye on your secured credit card balance and not let it creep too high relative to your credit limit.

Continue Reading

Trending