Connect with us

Credit Repair

Medical Bill’s – How To Handle Them

Published

on


Have you ever had a situation where you were uninsured or under-insured and got hit with a massive medical bill? If so, welcome to the club! There are hundreds of thousands of people that run into this problem every year with medical expenses. The problem is that typically when one does not have medical insurance or is under-insured, there is an underlying reason for that within’ their budget. Whether it be not enough income or the refusal to pay high medical premiums, this will stop you from addressing your medical bill obligations. If this is you, there are ways to take care of your medical bills without a one-time payment or letting it go to collections. We will discuss the many ways you can protect yourself from unexpected medical cost and come out of it in a good place financially. Let’s begin!

CONTINUE READING BELOW

Check Medical Bill for Accuracy

When you get a medical bill, the first thing you should do is make sure it is accurate. Check all of the work performed listed on the bill. Make sure the bill is specifically intended for you. Also if insurance was used, make sure the cost shown is accurate after insurance is applied. Lastly, this may sound like common sense, but make sure the bill is real. Yes, people are sending fake medical bills to people and they are paying them out of the fear it may drastically hurt their credit. Be sure to do your research before and and make sure the bill is accurate and reflects the actual services offered.

If it is inaccurate, then you should reach out to the hospital that you went to immediately. This needs to be addressed as soon as possible so it can be corrected before it’s too late. The last thing you want is for an unjustified charge to hit your pocketbook or even worse, land on your credit report from letting it sit too long unattended. If you did wait too long and the bill is on your credit report as a collection item, it’s not the end of the line. You can still dispute the charge if it was in fact inaccurate. Disputing the bill will force the hospital to prove those charges really do belong to you beyond a reasonable doubt. To file a dispute, visit How to start a credit dispute to learn how.

Pay Them ASAP

Try your best to your medical bills as soon as possible. While this is typically a lot of money if uninsured or under-insured, it will save you some major headaches down the line from not addressing the problems. It will also save you from even more potential fees associated with the debt. It sounds good on paper, but I’m almost certain that if you’re here, you probably let the bill go juuust a little bit past due. While this is okay and won’t hurt you yet, do no let it progress further. Take action on your medical bill that’s due ASAP and avoid having to do a lot more down the line. You will thank The Credit Dojo later.

What To Do If Medical Bill Goes To Collections

If the medical bill hist collections, there is no need to panic quite yet. While a collection item on your credit report looks bad to potential lenders, it is not the end of the world. There are still plenty of ways to address these items. You can do one of the following:

Speak directly with the Accounts Receivable Department of the hospital

if you want to avoid collections all together, this would be a good starting point. At the end of the day, all they want is money. depending on how you describe your situation to the Accounts Receivable team, they can work with you in ways you didn’t believe was possible. They will take much smaller monthly payments or even in some cases reduce the total amount owed. Try this before putting in more effort with the other methods for addressing a medical bill

Speak to the collections agency and ask for a Pay For Deletion in writing

If you plan to go this route, no matter what, MAKE SURE YOU GET THIS IN WRITING! Sorry, I had to emphasize the importance of this as in some cases, people were told one thing over the phone, but in reality had to deal with the blemish on their credit report for 7 years due to the creditor not holding up to their end of the bargain. Make sure if this type of agreement is made, it is clear in writing. A sample Pay for Deletion letter can be found in the sites download section, or by clicking HERE.

Pay, then send goodwill letter

If you do end up paying the bill in full, this is not the end of the line. You still have options to fix the situation and rid yourself of that negative mark reported by the creditor. You can send a goodwill letter to the creditor explaining your situation and how you fell behind. Typically if you have a valid enough reason, they will remove the mark from you credit report altogether seeing as the financial obligation has been satisfied

Dispute the item with the credit bureau

This is the absolute last resort that you’ll want to take when dealing with the collection agencies. If all of the above has failed and you still have this item on your credit report, dispute the item either via the mail, over the phone or through the credit bureaus online dispute forms (every credit bureau now allows you to dispute almost anything online). For more information on how to initiate a credit dispute, check out the article on How to start a credit dispute.

CONTINUE READING BELOW

Don’t Let A Medical Bill Hinder You

Don’t let a financial obligation in relation to a medical bill hurt your good financial standing (credit). Take action to ensure it is paid in a timely manner. Be sure to utilize the tactics that are listed in this article to prevent or erase any negative mark on your credit. Thank you for visiting The Credit Dojo. Look out for more articles coming soon based on real world experience and professional research. While waiting, if you need to monitor your credit, visit Credit Sesame.


If you wish to learn more about credit, then visit the following articles for more information:

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Credit Repair

Has Your Identity Been Stolen?

Published

on

Identity theft and data breaches are increasingly common threats to anyone who makes transactions online or shares their information with an online platform. Identity theft has evolved into various forms with fraudsters finding new ways to bypass security systems. Read this blog about data breaches on Facebook & LinkedIn.

A 2019 report put the number of identity theft victims at 13 million in the US. Attacks cost them $3.5 billion out of pocket. The risk of identity theft is higher for those on social media platforms. Identity thieves use automated software to scrape and aggregate public information from social media platforms creating a profile that can be used fraudulently.

327 million users in the recent LinkedIn data breach suffered such an attack. Facebook has recently come under fire over a misreported data breach that affected more than 500 million of its users’ personal information.

It seems we’re all at risk of having our data “pwned” in a breach or getting hacked. How can you protect yourself as a consumer? To better protect yourself from a data breach, you need to know what you’re up against.

The Most Common Types of Identity Theft Online

  • Account Takeover

    Account takeover occurs when someone gains access to your accounts and takes control of them without your knowledge or consent. They can transact and withdraw funds just as you would.

  • Debit and Credit Card Fraud

    This type of fraud occurs when someone makes unauthorized transactions using your card. They don’t need your physical card, the card number, pin, and security code are sufficient to do damage and even attempt hacking your other accounts.

  • Online Shopping Fraud

    This is most common when using public WIFI. Scammers will pose as fake merchant websites to collect your payment information when you check out.

  • Mail Fraud

    If your mail is intercepted, sensitive personal information like social security numbers can be acquired. Be vigilant and spot if any in mail statements you have subscribed to fail to arrive.

  • Tax Identity Theft

    Fraudsters file tax returns using your personal details and then keep your tax refunds. This type of identity theft has been on the uptick due to the new programs related to COVID-19 such as the direct stimulus check and tax due date extensions.

  • Senior Identity Theft

    Senior citizens are particularly prone to identity theft scams. Scammers get senior citizens to divulge personal information by pretending to call from the IRS or Social Security Administration.

    Often their social security numbers are used to create fraudulent profiles and take out lines of credit.

  • Medical Identity Theft

    This occurs when someone poses as you to get medical care in your name. You will get extra charges on medical services you didn’t use or your medical insurance premiums go up inexplicably.

  • Signs of Identity Theft

    These warning signs can be spotted through regularly monitoring your credit report and finances.

    1. Strange transactions on your debit or credit cards
    2. Credit card bills and statement fail to come in the mail without you opting into paperless billing
    3. Your credit score going up or down inexplicably without any different actions on your part
    4. Unrecognized social security number in your records
    5. Rejected electronic tax return
    6. Receiving an unrequested tax transcript
    7. You’re denied a credit card application or loan with no known reason
    8. New accounts and credit cards in your name that you didn’t apply for
    9. Debt collector calls about unknown accounts
    10. Inaccurate medical records

How To Check If My Identity Has Been Stolen

Here are the signs to look out for if you suspect that you’re a victim of identity theft.

  • Check your credit card bill and bank account statements often and report any discrepancies immediately no matter how small.
  • Run your credit report or register for a credit monitoring service that can do it for you. Data breaches may affect your credit score.
  • Monitor your finances closely can help you spot trial transactions by identity thieves
  • Use trusted data leak check tools like HIBP or the one by Cybernews to verify if your email address, phone number, and domains have been in data breaches.

Here’s some more information on how to detect identity theft.

What To Do If Your Identity Is Stolen

  1. The first step is to report the instance of identity theft immediately to the relevant organizations such as your bank or credit card issuer. Have them cancel the cards and issue new ones. Most importantly, freeze your credit with the credit bureaus to make sure more damage can’t be done.
  2. Change account details associated with the cards such as usernames, pins, and passwords.
  3. File a police report and check out FTC’s identity theft site to report the identity theft and get a recovery plan.
  4. Regularly review your credit report. US citizens are entitled to one free credit report per year.
  5. Request the removal of the fraudulent activity from your credit report. You can also dispute
  6. Set up a fraud alert that has multiple-factor authentication before processing a new application. You can also freeze your credit which will bar any new applications. It will make credit applications more complicated for you but is well worth the hassle.

How To Protect Yourself From Identity Theft

It’s better to be proactive rather than waiting to mop up the mess after a data breach or identity theft attack. Here are safety measures you can apply:

  1. Use strong passwords with two-factor authentication or sign up for secure password managers like 1Password.
  2. Never share personal information over the phone since legitimate organizations will never call to ask you for these details
  3. Only use trusted WiFi networks especially when banking or shopping online.
  4. Check your credit report regularly and monitor your finances for discrepancies
  5. Keep your social security card in a secure place, never in your wallet.
  6. Review healthcare and insurance notices for any suspicious activity or dates that don’t add up
  7. Protect your mail by shredding any personal information. Monitor your mail to make sure no notices or bills are missing.
  8. Be mindful of anyone looking over your shoulder as you enter sensitive information.

The best way to combat identity theft is a combination of robust passwords and caution in your online transactions. Constantly monitor your credit report, your finances, and insurance notices to catch the fraud early.

Summary

Data Breaches on Facebook & LinkedIn: Has Your Identity Been Stolen?

Article Name

Data Breaches on Facebook & LinkedIn: Has Your Identity Been Stolen?

Description

Read this blog about data breaches on Facebook & LinkedIn. Identity theft has evolved into various forms with fraudsters finding new ways to bypass security systems.

Author

Jason M. Kaplan, Esq.

Publisher Name

The Credit Pros

Publisher Logo

Source link

Continue Reading

Credit Repair

How Does Mortgage Interest Work?

Published

on

Mortgage interest rates are a crucial determinant of whether a renter takes the leap into homeownership. Lenders will typically finance up to 80% of the buying price. It is important to understand how mortgage interest works and what goes into your monthly mortgage payments before you sign up.

The total monthly amount that you pay may have other payments tacked onto it such as:

  • Fixed-Rate Mortgages

    A fixed-rate mortgage is one where the interest rate is locked for the entire repayment period. Your monthly repayments are also fixed throughout.

    This type of loan typically has a long lifespan of 30 years. Shorter repayment periods of 10, 15, or 20 years are available at a lower interest percentage but higher monthly repayments.

    Example: A $300,000 mortgage for 30 years at an annual interest rate of 3.42% following a 20% downpayment breaks down as follows:

    • Monthly repayment for 30 years (360 months) – $1,577.85
    • Total mortgage size (principal) – $240,000
    • Total mortgage interest – $144,126.57
    • The monthly $1,577.85 = $ 1,067.02 (principal & interest) + $ 400.00 (property tax) + $ 110.83 (Homeowners Insurance)

    In the beginning, about 75% of your loan repayment is applied to the interest while 25% goes to the principal. As your interest accrued diminishes, more and more of your monthly fee is applied to the principal loan amount. This is called building equity.

    Eventually, by your last payments, the whole monthly fee will be applied to paying off the principal.

    A mortgage calculator can help paint a financial picture for you for the coming years.

    One financial tip for decreasing your interest rates over time is to apply lump-sum payments to the principal of the mortgage loan. A smaller principal equals less interest.

    Think end-of-year bonuses, tax refunds, and other auxiliary money coming in. Or you can add the lump sum to your monthly savings budget. If you need help saving money, here’s a short beginner’s guide on how to save money.

    The primary benefit of fixed-rate mortgages is predictability. You know how much you will pay monthly for the next 30 years. You’re protected from interest rate fluctuations.

    Longer repayment periods allow you to have the lowest monthly payments but cost more overall because you pay more interest.

    Shorter payment periods have lower interest rates but the monthly burden on your budget is much higher.

  • Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

    In this type of loan, the interest rate is variable. The lender will usually start you off on an initial interest rate that is lower than that of a comparable fixed-rate loan.

    As the repayment period progresses, the interest rate slowly increases. If left long enough, the interest rate may eventually surpass that of fixed-rate loans.

    Some of the considerations and terms to keep in mind for adjustable-rate mortgages (ARM) are:

    • Adjustment Frequency is the period between interest rate increments and is usually pre-arranged.
    • Adjustment Indexes are the benchmark on which your interest rate adjustment is based. The benchmark could be the treasury bill interest rate.
    • Margin is the amount above the adjustment index you agree to pay for your mortgage interest rate.
    • Caps refer to the limit on how much the adjustment is raised per period. In the case of a negatively amortizing loan, it is a cap on your total monthly payment.
    • Ceiling is the highest amount your interest rate is allowed to reach during the lifetime of the loan.

    Please note that in the case of negatively amortizing loans, the cap only applies to a portion of the interest. If the interest is left to accrue, it becomes a part of the principal resulting in a higher owed sum than what was borrowed.

    Example: A 5/1 hybrid ARM starts with a five-year period on a fixed interest rate. Thereafter, the interest rate rises according to the capped limit per period until you finish paying off the loan or the interest rate reaches the ceiling. Here is a breakdown:

    • A $200,000 loan for 30 years will be charged at 4% for the first five years
    • Monthly repayment for the first 60 months is $955
    • The next 12 months’ rate goes up by 0.25% to $980 then $1055 in the following year and so on.
    • These amounts don’t include insurance and taxes.

    The main benefits of ARMs are:

    • They are cheaper than fixed-rate loans in the short term up to seven years.
    • The borrower can qualify for a bigger loan due to lower initial payments
    • In a falling-interest market, the borrower enjoys lower interests and repayments without refinancing the mortgage

    The major downside of ARMs is the fluctuating monthly payment which can be a significant burden for large loans or if the interest rate doubles.

  • Interest-Only Loans and Jumbo Mortgage Loans

    These third and fourth loan options are mainly geared towards wealthy homeowners.

    Interest-only loans allow your monthly payments to be applied only to the interest for the first few years. The monthly payments will be lower but you will not be building equity. This type of loan is best for the homeowner who expects to sell soon and move on.

    Jumbo mortgage loans are those where the loan amount is higher than the conforming loan limit set by the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The US national baseline in 2021 is $548,250. In certain parts like New York, San Francisco, Hawaii, and Alaska, the limit goes up by 150%.

    Jumbo mortgages can be fixed-rate, adjustable-rate, or interest-only. In all cases, the interest rates tend to be higher.

  • Other Costs

    Even with a great interest rate, other costs associated with being a homeowner can bump up your monthly repayment.

    Real-estate taxes and homeowner’s insurance are sometimes included by lenders in the mortgage payment. The money is held in escrow for the lender to pay the bills as they arise.

    Homeowner’s Association (HOA) fees can also be quite steep depending on the property location and type.

    The type of mortgage you choose depends on how much you can pay monthly and how long you intend to live in the house. The interest rate forecast trends matter and whether you have sufficient cushion to finance ARMs.

  • Your main aim is to get an interest rate that is great for your pocket and will bring you closer to your financial goal of being a homeowner. Interest rates are determined based on the interest rate set by the Fed and your credit score. See how your credit score can affect your interest rates!

    Source link

    Continue Reading

    Credit Repair

    How You Hurt Credit Score

    Published

    on

    Most people have a general idea of how good their credit is. If you pay your bills, don’t borrow too much, and keep a good mix of credit, you’ll probably have very good credit… right? Get to know how you hurt credit score.

    Well, not necessarily. There are ways that we inadvertently harm our own credit without even realizing it. Here are 5 things that could be hurting your credit, even if you’re not aware of them.

  • You haven’t checked your credit report recently.

    Your credit report will tell you all of the information that lenders use to determine your creditworthiness and your credit scores. (As a matter of fact, you actually have multiple credit scores all used for different purposes). The information that they need to know in order to decide whether or not to lend to you is all in your credit report. If you don’t know what’s on your credit report, then you’re left in the dark. You don’t know if you owe something that you forgot about or if there’s a mistake on your report that’s causing you problems.

    Many Americans don’t know how they can check their credit report, or if it costs money. Normally, getting access to your credit report will cost some money; however, the US government has made it so that anyone can check their full credit report once a year, from each of the three credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion), completely free. In order to access your credit report, go to https://annualcreditreport.com (an official US government site) and follow the instructions.

    By checking your credit report, you’ll know what items are on there that could be hurting your credit score. Some of those items might be fraudulent, or they might be on your report by mistake. If you find items on your credit report that shouldn’t be there, you can dispute them by contacting the credit bureau that issued your credit report. Finding and eliminating these items is an important part of what credit repair companies like The Credit Pros do.

  • You never closed that phone plan, cable plan, utilities plan, or some other account.

    Many telecommunications and energy companies make it very difficult to cancel your subscription, which can cause undue payments to make it to your credit report. Not only that, but sometimes we forget to cancel our subscriptions before we move. As a result, we end up getting bills sent to our old address and we never see them.

    Since payment history is an important part of determining your creditworthiness, some of these contracts will be reflected on your credit report. If you miss a payment and the debt becomes past due, goes into default, or goes into collections, this information will be reflected on your credit report and your credit score will be dinged.

    You might have no idea if you still have these debts, and the only way to know is to check your credit report. Unfortunately, much of the damage would have already been done, however by settling the debt (preferably with a lump sum payment) you can see that item disappear from your credit report after seven years. You may also be able to arrange something with the company where they agree to get that item removed from your credit report, however this is up to the company’s discretion.

  • You’re not receiving statements from ALL your credit cards (even the ones that you’re sure should have a $0 balance)

    Similarly to the situation above, many people don’t receive credit card statements from all their cards. The average American has 3 credit cards, and many Americans have more than three. However, there’s rarely a reason to use all of those cards, so you may be only using one and keeping the others open.

    While keeping your credit accounts open is generally a good idea (and you don’t need to have a physical credit card for these accounts in order to do so), you want to make sure that you continue to receive statements for these cards. This is because, in simple terms, stuff happens. A fraudster may get a hold of one of those credit card numbers and start buying things online. Or, you may have made a purchase long ago that you had forgotten. Or, interest charges that accrued later may have stayed on the card. Whatever the case, you need to know whether or not you actually owe anything on ALL the credit accounts you have!

  • Your credit card balance is too high, even if you’re making payments toward it.

    One aspect of your credit score is your credit utilization ratio, which is the ratio of credit used over credit available. What does this mean? Let’s say you have a $10,000 limit credit card and your balance is $3,000. This means you have a credit utilization ratio of 30%.

    A credit utilization ratio of over 35% is generally considered a negative, as it means you’re using a large chunk of your available credit at one time. Even if you’re making all your payments on time, a high credit utilization ratio could harm your credit score over time.

    We recommend asking for a credit limit increase and setting a limit on spending with your bank or credit card provider. This way, you can guarantee that your credit utilization ratio never goes too high.

  • You avoid using credit cards or borrowing money because you’re concerned about debt.

    This one is less about hurting your credit, and more about preventing your ability to build credit. However, the hard truth about credit is that bad credit is BETTER than no credit. There is no credit score that is so low that you’d be better off by having no credit history whatsoever.

    There are Americans who swear off the use of credit cards and debt entirely in order to avoid potential problems with debt. This is a fine approach if you never intend on buying a home with a mortgage, or securing an apartment for rent in some places, or getting a job that requires a credit check. However, what’s more common is that there are Americans who use credit very sparingly and, as a result, they don’t have enough of a credit history to use debt that could potentially improve their standard of living, secure a business loan, or give them access to leveraged investments such as real estate.

  • Source link

    Continue Reading

    Trending