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How Your Credit Score Impacts Your Financial Future

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Improving your Financial FutureYour credit score is a numerical reflection of your credit history. The score is given as a 3-digit number between 300 to 850 and is an indication of how creditworthy you are. You can get both your credit report and credit score from Annual Credit Report.Com.

Generally, a higher credit score increases your credibility to lenders and opens you up to better terms of credit. On the other hand, the lower your credit score, the riskier you appear as a borrower.

More specifically, your credit score impacts your financial future in several ways:

1.  Your Credit Score Influences Eligibility for Employment

When employers are vetting prospective employees, a large percentage also run a background check which may include credit checks. Notably, they cannot access your credit score but they can access your credit reports.

Credit reports give details of your borrowing and payment history, which can give a hint of how well you fair in your credit score. Some employers may take this as a reflection of how well you can handle money, your decision-making ability, and your potential to be involved in criminal activity.

Note: According to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, prospective employers are obligated to inform you in writing if a credit check is a requirement in the hiring process and seek your written consent on the same.

2.  Your Credit Score Determines your Qualification for a Loan

Whether you require a private, auto, or business loan, a good credit score is paramount. It is the biggest factor in determining whether your loan gets approved, the amount that you receive, and the interest rates of the loan.

Typically, for SBA and term loans, you will need a minimum credit score of 680. Still, business loan providers consider a score of between 640 and 700 as good. For an auto loan, you will require a minimum score of 660.

While it is still possible to get loans with a low credit score, your choices will be limited. Further, the few lenders who are willing to work with you will charge higher rates, significantly raising your monthly payments.

3.  Your Score Affects Your Ability to Buy or Rent a House

Just like the case with other lenders, mortgage companies depend on your credit record to determine your eligibility for a mortgage. A good score, such as 760 and above, reflects your ability to honor your payments.

On the other hand, you might not strike a deal with many lenders if your score is 640 and below. If you do, they will impose high-interest rates to cover the risk of delayed payments or defaulting.

When you are looking to rent a house, it is common for some landlords to run credit checks. By so doing, they can only get your credit report and not your credit score. That said, there’s no minimum credit score to qualify you to rent.

However, a landlord may use your payment habits and your current debt to decide if they should approve you to rent or not.

 5. Your Credit Score Determines Whether you Get Mortgage Refinancing or Not

Are you looking to lower the interest rate on your current mortgage? You can do that by refinancing. This can also help you get a shorter loan term, reduce your monthly payments, or switch to a fixed-rate mortgage.

To refinance your mortgage, the credit requirements may vary from one lender to another. Nevertheless, you will need a credit score of 620 and over for a conventional mortgage refinance. If you are lucky, you can get refinancing from government programs with a score of 580.

By contrast, if you want to try your luck with private lenders, you may need a credit score of up to 750. In any case, higher credit scores translate to higher chances of loan refinancing approval, better loan terms, and lower interest rates.

Besides your score, you will also need a minimum of 20% property equity and funds to cater for other costs related to refinancing.

The Bottom Line

Many aspects of your financial future are pegged on how you have handled your financial responsibilities in the past. Your credit score is a good indicator of this information. With good credit, you can live more comfortably, access financing when you need it, and avoid extra expenses brought about by a low score.

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What is Experian’s Credit Boost?-An Overview

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Experian credit boost

What is Experian Boost and how does it work?

Credit scores below 650 are one of the most significant financial burdens you will face in your lifetime. Poor, or even fair, credit scores may disqualify you from qualifying for certain types of credit accounts or loans, depending on your situation. This may also result in higher rates of interest being charged. This means that if your credit score improves, you will be eligible for better interest rates and loan terms in the future as well.

So, how do you plan on improving your credit score in the future? Experian’s Credit Boost, also known as Experian Boost, is a new service that will be able to assist you in accomplishing exactly that.

Experian is one of the three major credit bureaus operating in the United States. They collect information on people from a variety of sources, including mortgage lenders, credit card companies, banks, and other financial institutions, as well as from public records and collection agencies.

In addition, the company issues credit reports, which contain information about a consumer’s delinquencies, credit accounts, and other items such as bankruptcies throughout their credit history. This will also provide consumers with a credit score, which is calculated using a proprietary formula that is specific to them. Experian is currently offering a brand new program dubbed Experian Boost, which is intended to assist people in improving their credit rating.

There have already been some positive outcomes reported as a result of the program’s implementation. According to Experian’s reports, users of Experian Boost have seen an average increase of 13 points in their FICO credit score since signing up.

Since the launch of Experian Boost, approximately 60% of its users have noticed an improvement in their credit scores. You must keep in mind, however, that results may differ from person to person. Some users did not notice any changes in their scores or their chances of getting approved, and this was due to technical difficulties. Some lenders do not use Experian credit files at all, and others do not use the scores that have been affected by Experian Boost, which is another issue.

Experian Boost – How Does It Function?

For you to be able to take advantage of this free program, you must first create an Experian Boost account. You should keep in mind that this is a separate account from your Experian account. When you sign up, you will be asked to create your own profile and to provide Experian with some personal information about yourself.

You will need to link the bank accounts that you use to pay your utility bills to the program once you have completed the registration process and have obtained your own account. If you want your utility bill payments to have a positive impact on your credit score, you must link the bank accounts that you use to pay them to the program.

Your payment history will then be transmitted by Boost to Experian, which will then use it to calculate your credit score as part of the calculation. These payments will appear on your credit report alongside the rest of the open accounts and credit lines that you currently have in place.

In particular, one feature of Boost that appeals to me is that it only reports the payment history of your bank account that has been positive. If you didn’t make your phone bill payment last year, it won’t be reported. It is this that distinguishes it from the traditional methods of calculating credit scores.

Experian Boost will almost certainly be able to work in your favor when it comes to improving your credit score because it will only show positive payments on your reports.

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Why Do Employers Check Employees’ Credit? What Do They Look For?

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employers check employee credit

Employers today evaluate applicants based on their previous work experience, skills, and attitude. Depending on the information contained in the candidate’s resume and the information obtained during the interview, employers can make hiring decisions in a variety of positions. However, there are some instances in which your credit score is also important in your job search process.

While potential employers cannot check your credit score in its entirety, they can obtain a copy of your credit report and use it to assess your judgment and determine whether or not you pose a financial risk to the company. Interviews are already stressful situations, so being aware of what potential employers can and cannot find out about you through a credit check can alleviate one of your concerns significantly.

Is it possible for an employer to see your credit score?

During a job application, prospective employers will not be able to see your three-digit credit score. However, they can still view a version of their credit report that differs from the version that potential lenders can view. What they can look at is a modified report that does not contain information such as your account numbers, date of birth, information about your spouse, or other information that could be used to violate the laws governing equal employment opportunities.

In light of the fact that the purpose of your credit score is to demonstrate to a lender whether or not you are creditworthy, it is unlikely that potential employers will consider it when making hiring decisions. Therefore, it is not included in the report and is not visible to them.

What information can employers access from your credit report?

Personal information such as your name, Social Security number, and address will be included in the modified credit report that is made available to potential employers only. This will include information about your incurred debt, such as credit card debt, mortgage debt, student loan debt, and your payment history for each of these types of obligations.

If this is the case, why would potential employers be interested in obtaining access to your credit report? Employers may take this action for a variety of reasons. It is possible that a credit report will reveal a lack of financial responsibility if money management is part of the job. This could also indicate financial distress, which could increase the likelihood of theft or fraud.

Employers can reduce the risks associated with the hiring process by checking off prospective employees who have some red flags on their credit reports. For example, if the applicant’s credit report shows a pattern of late payments or something more serious, employers may interpret this as an indication that the applicant lacks adequate organizational skills.

Before running a person’s credit report, it is mandatory for employers to obtain the applicant’s permission first. If an applicant is not hired as a result of the information contained in his or her credit report, the employer isIn

In conclusion

Essentially, a credit report can assist potential employers in determining how responsible and trustworthy you are as a potential employee. It is especially useful if you are applying for a position in which you will be responsible for managing financial information or working with sensitive customer data.

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Personal Credit Scores & Business Loans

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Will Your Personal Credit Score Affect Your Business Loan Application?

Congratulations! You’ve decided to begin the process of applying for a small business loan. This is an exciting time for your new or existing company and could forecast many great things.

If this is your first time applying for a business loan, you might not be aware of the potential barriers that can get in your way. After all, receiving a business loan for your start-up or expansion can be competitive, and banks want to ensure that they trust only the best with their investments. Before you jump all in, you’ll want to have a clear understanding of the things that could qualify or even disqualify you from receiving funding.

Business Credit

One of these factors is your personal credit score.

If you are a small business owner in the United States, the three credit bureaus track two profiles: your personal financial history and your business credit history. Each profile plays a vital role in getting approved for a business loan. However, if your starting a new business or your existing business doesn’t have established business credit, the lender may rely more heavily on your personal creditworthiness when making their lending decision.

While your personal credit score and business credit profile express different information about you and your business, both have a substantial impact on the options available to your business and your ability to qualify for a loan.

Why Lenders Care About Your Personal Credit Score

Some business owners don’t think that their personal credit score has much of an impact when it comes to their organization. This just isn’t the case. A potential creditor is going to consider your personal credit score when making a decision to grant your company a business loan.

In general, a potential lender is going to view your credit score to determine if you:

  • Have the ability to repay the loan?
  • Are going to repay the loan?
  • Will pay the loan even if something unexpected happens?

Lenders see your credit score as an insight into your financial health and responsibility. Unfortunately, if a lender sees that you are not able to manage your personal finances, they may assume that you are a high risk for managing business finances as well. This is especially true if you are a new business owner. Without an established business history or credit to your company’s name, the only way the lender will be able to determine creditworthiness is by accessing your personal credit score.

How is my credit score calculated?

Three primary credit bureaus generate a credit score for lenders to access. Each reporting agency uses the same basic FICO formula to score the information that they collect. They also obtain personal information such as full legal name, date of birth, employment history, address, etc. They also list a summary of information that was provided to them by your creditors. Other information found in public records like bankruptcy or judgments are also included on your credit report and factored into your score. Each time that you apply for credit is also recorded on your report.

There are primary differences in the way that the three credit bureaus review and calculate your personal credit history. For example, Transunion holds more detail about your employment information, Equifax separates your accounts that are open and closed, and Experian will record data like whether or not you are paying your rent and other bills on time. Essentially, these agencies are competitors, and lenders may choose to report to one bureau and not the other. While their data might include different results, their score is typically similar.

Importance of a Good Credit Score For Your Business

While you may not feel that your personal credit history is the best representation of how you will meet and exceed your business’s financial obligations, the need to establish and maintain a positive credit score is vital for every small business owner. Most banks and lenders take a close look at your credit score when they evaluate your worthiness as a business borrower and even consider the score in their decision-making process – regardless of how long your business has been operating.

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