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How to Repair Your Credit

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Do-it-yourself projects are so popular, the
market for them could be worth close to $14 billion by 2021. From home renovations to
credit repair, consumers are taking control back into their own hands.

That’s right: Anybody, including you, can make
DIY credit repair their next personal project.
If you’re suffering from bad credit and want to get your personal finances in
order, credit repair is a process that can help ensure your credit report is
totally fair and accurate—and that your score is fair and accurate as well.

Get a Free Credit Report Consultation Today

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Did you know the Federal Trade Commission
found 1 in 5 Americans had an error on their credit report?
Those errors could make you pay more for auto loans, home insurance and more.
Hidden credit report mistakes can be as harmful as hidden leaks around the
home.

Want to roll up your sleeves and fix the
situation yourself? We’ve got you covered. Here’s our step-by-step guide for
how to repair your credit on your own.

What is DIY credit repair?

First off, let’s clear up what credit repair
is and isn’t.

Mistakes on a credit report can happen. That’s
reality. Credit reporting agencies employ real people, and so do lenders and
creditors. Human error can lead to inaccurate data reporting that negatively
impacts your credit history and credit score, like an on-time payment being
marked as late.

The credit repair process involves three basic
steps:

  1. Identifying credit report mistakes.
  2. Disputing incorrect information with the credit bureaus.
  3. Getting errors removed or corrected.

The upside is that you can undertake all the
necessary action on your own. Just be aware that DIY credit repair will require
its fair share of elbow grease and effort. If that’s not your style, a credit
repair company can help.

However, credit repair only works for negative
information that is inaccurate, unfair or unsubstantiated. If the information
is accurate and timely, credit repair is probably not an option. That said,
there’s no telling what credit report mistakes could be hurting you until you
take a look! Your credit score affects a lot, including your eligibility for
loans and the rates you are offered. Without a fair credit score, you might not
get a fair quote or interest rate, which is why ensuring your score is accurate
has long-reaching implications.

Step 1: Request your free credit
report(s)

Credit repair all starts with your credit
report. Your FICO score alone can’t tell you much about the
specific negative information affecting it. You need your entire credit report
to give you the full story.

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you are entitled to a free credit
report from each of the three major credit bureaus every 12 months. Requesting
your report from Equifax, Experian and TransUnion is the first step in credit repair.
You have a few options for getting a copy.

Online

The FTC instructs consumers to visit www.annualcreditreport.com
for requesting credit reports online. It is the
only website authorized by the federal government
for such purposes, so be
diligent and make sure you are using the right URL. Scammers often create
similar-sounding websites or use “free credit report” in the URL to
trick unwitting consumers.

Once you’ve verified your identity, your
credit report(s) will be sent to you immediately.

Phone

You can also call 1-877-322-8228 and go
through the verification process by phone. Your credit report will be mailed
within 15 days of a phone request.

Mail

Download the official request form, print it
and fill it out according to the instructions. Then mail it back.

Annual Credit Report Request Service
PO Box 105281
Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

Your credit report will be sent within 15
days.

One thing to think about is whether you want
to request all three reports at once or stagger them over 12 months. The
stagger strategy can help you keep a closer eye on changes in your credit
report over the year. If you find an error in one report, though, you won’t
know if it’s replicated in your other reports unless you check them, too. The
bureaus don’t gather or report all the same information.

Step 2: Read the report line by
line

Once you’ve got the hard copy, it’s time to
dig in!

Don’t be surprised if you find it hard to read
your credit report at first. Unless you have experience with such documents, it
can look like a jumble of names, numbers and boxes.

Basically, it’s a summary of your accounts,
payment history and other information reported by lenders and creditors. To
help make sense of all that content, let’s break down what appears in a credit
report (this example from Experian is useful in
following along):

  • Personal identifying information: Identity-related
    information like your name, address, Social Security number and date of birth
    starts off the report.
  • Account information: These are records related
    to your credit accounts; broadly, this category covers type, age, ownership and
    payment status of accounts.
  • Inquiry information: Hard and soft inquiries
    are listed out on your report. Soft inquiries don’t impact your score, but hard inquiries do and can remain on your
    report for up to two years.
  • Bankruptcies: Any public records related to
    bankruptcy type and filing date will appear here.
  • Collections: Past due accounts that are with
    collection agencies will be noted.

Step 3: Look for credit report
mistakes

This step is where the real meat of the credit
repair process is at: checking your credit report for errors.

WARNING: Credit report mistakes can come in all shapes and sizes, some of them
not easily detectable. Here’s what to look for:

  • Negative items that are outside
    the statute of limitations (i.e., older than seven years for most credit
    information and older than 10 years for bankruptcy information).
  • Misspellings in your name or inaccurate
    personal information.
  • Accounts that don’t actually
    belong to you or are mistakenly attributed to you.
  • Closed accounts being reported as
    open, or accounts incorrectly listed as “closed by grantor.”
  • On-time payments that were marked
    as late.
  • The same debt being listed more
    than once.
  • Accounts that were opened as a
    result of identity theft.
  • Inaccurate or unapproved inquiry
    information.
  • Wrong credit limit or paid balance
    amounts.

So how can you root out these errors? It’s
going to take a very close reading of
your report. Your credit repair to-do list should, at the least, include the
following:

  1. Making sure your personal information is all correct and your file isn’t mixed with someone else who shares a similar name.
  2. Taking a fine-tooth comb to your account information, specifically looking at account number, status, individual vs. joint responsibility, open/close dates, credit type, term, highest and current balances, credit limit, monthly payment, late payments and statements or remarks.
  3. Verifying the origin of hard inquiries, confirming you gave your consent.
  4. Looking for bankruptcy information that is older than 10 years.
  5. Searching for anything else that may be reported incorrectly, as certain protections exist for consumers with active duty military status, for example.

Step 4: Dispute errors with
credit bureaus

If you’ve found one or two errors, or three or four—or even 28, as the average customer for CreditRepair.com did in 2018—it’s time to dispute the inaccurate information.

A formal dispute consists of a letter you write to the credit bureau officially notifying it of the error(s). It helps to use a credit dispute letter template so you can make sure everything is in the right place. Your letter should include the following:

  • Your personal and contact
    information.
  • Each mistake you found and the
    outcome you desire, like removal or correction of inaccurate information.
  • Copies of records, documents and
    other evidence showing credit report information is inaccurate or outside the
    statute of limitations. Never send originals!
  • An annotated copy of your report,
    like red circles around suspect data.

Once the credit bureau receives the letter, an
investigation will be started and you should have a response within 30–45 days. That means the credit
bureau will either remove the information, correct it or confirm the negative
information with its own evidence. It must also send results to you in writing.

Here’s contact information for the credit bureaus and
options for getting the dispute process started.

Equifax

Equifax Information Services LLC
PO Box 740256
Atlanta, GA 30348

Visit this page or
call 866-349-5191

Experian

Experian
PO Box 4500
Allen, TX 75013

Visit this page or
call 888-397-3742

TransUnion

TransUnion LLC
Consumer Dispute Center
PO Box 2000
Chester, PA 19016

Visit this page or
call 800-916-8800

Step 5: Dispute errors with
lender

You will need to dispute inaccuracies with
your original creditors as well, not just the credit bureau. This entails
contacting the furnisher of the inaccurate data, usually the lender or creditor
associated with an account. If you don’t dispute the information with the
creditor, they may end up re-submitting the errors to the credit bureaus,
resulting in it being re-added to your credit report.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
(CFPB) has some helpful resources on this front, including a
sample letter you can send to businesses that supplied the information.

This step is very similar to disputing errors
with credit bureaus. You’ll want to cover all the bases in your formal letter,
including your contact information, clear identification of mistakes and copies
of supporting documents. These companies are required to respond to disputes,
so they often have a dedicated address for sending letters.

According to the FTC, if the information is
found to be inaccurate, the provider may not report it to credit bureaus again.

Step 6: Build your credit

And there you have it—a step-by-step guide to
DIY credit repair. But the task doesn’t exactly end there. It may take six
months or more for any change to appear in your credit report and then later be
reflected in your score.

In that time, you can still take more steps to
build credit yourself. Monthly budgeting, making timely payments and
not maxing out your credit cards are all good strategies for smarter personal
finances. Understanding the five factors that go into your credit score—payment
history, credit utilization, account mix, inquiries, and age of accounts—can
also help you target areas for improvement.

Another thing to think about is preventative
credit repair. Regularly reviewing your credit report can help you uncover
inaccurate negative information more quickly. If you know it’s there, then you
can better address it. Besides regularly reviewing your free copies of your
credit report, consider signing up for Credit.com’s free
Credit Report Card.
We show you your Experian credit score, updated
every two weeks. If your score falls, it could mean that it’s time to look more
closely at your full credit report for errors and inaccuracies.

Want to learn more about the credit repair
process and whether it’s worth working with a credit repair company? Visit
Credit.com for more information, tips, articles and reviews of some of our
favorite credit repair companies, like Lexington Law and CreditRepair.com.


Disclosure: Credit.com and
CreditRepair.com are both owned by the same company, Progrexion Holdings Inc.
John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PC, d/b/a Lexington Law Firm is an independent
law firm that uses Progrexion as a provider of business and administrative
services.

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4 QC agencies receive emergency help

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Four Quad-City area agencies are among 35 in Iowa that will receive Emergency Solutions Grant Program funds.

In Scott County

  • Family Resources will receive $142,092 for shelter and outreach and $75,600 for homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing, for a total of $217,692.
  • Humility Homes and Services, Inc. will receive $200,000 for shelter and outreach, and $273,335 for homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing; for a total of $473,335.
  • The Salvation Army Quad Cities Family Services will receive $75,000 for shelter and outreach and $229,119 for homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing, for a total of $304,119.

In Muscatine County

  • The Muscatine Center for Social Action (MCSA) will receive $200,000 for shelter and outreach programs, and $140,568 for homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing, for a total of $340,568.

About the program

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds announced Friday that a total of nearly $9 million in assistance is available to assist eligible low-income Iowans at imminent risk of eviction and individuals who have lost housing to quickly regain housing stability, a news release says. The funding also will provide support for homeless-shelter operations. The funds are made available through a supplemental appropriation to the Emergency Solutions Grant program through the federal CARES Act.

“Throughout the pandemic, our focus has always been on protecting the lives and livelihoods of Iowans,” said Reynolds. “The funds announced today will assist those at risk of eviction while also providing support to homeless shelters supporting Iowa’s homeless population at this critical time. I appreciate the continued collaboration with our federal partners in support of the state’s pandemic response.”  

“Providing housing assistance for Iowans in need remains a top priority,” said Iowa Finance Authority Executive Director Debi Durham. “The ability for Iowans to thrive and prosper begins with a safe, stable place to call home and the program announced today will be essential in helping Iowans get back on their feet.”   

The Emergency Solutions Grant program will help to prevent households from becoming homeless because of eviction, assist Iowans who have lost their homes to eviction regain rental housing, and provide homeless shelters with financial support to assist with operations and outreach while they work to serve Iowans in need and mitigate the spread of COVID-19.  

To be eligible for eviction-prevention assistance to avoid homelessness, Iowans must have an income of 50% of the area median income or less and be at imminent risk of eviction, in addition to meeting other eligibility criteria. To be eligible for assistance in rapidly regaining housing, Iowans must currently be experiencing homelessness.   

Examples of assistance available to eligible individuals include rent and utility payments, including in arrears, legal assistance, application fees, security and utility deposits, moving costs, case management and credit repair. All financial assistance is paid directly to landlords and service providers.    

Individuals in need of assistance must apply through the Coordinated Entry help line in their area, available along with additional eligibility and program information at iowahousingrecovery.com.   

Thirty-five agencies were awarded a total of $8.8 million in Emergency Solutions Grant Program funds. The full list of awards is available here. The assistance will remain available until all funds are exhausted or Sept. 30, 2022.   

The Emergency Solutions Grant program is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Iowa Finance Authority in partnership with participating Iowa service agencies.  

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Gov. Reynolds announces assistance to low-income Iowans in preventing eviction or regaining housing

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DES MOINES, Ia. (KMTV) — Statement from the office of Governor Kim Reynolds

Governor Reynolds today announced that a total of nearly $9 million in assistance is available to eligible low-income Iowans who are at imminent risk of eviction and individuals who have lost housing to quickly regain housing stability. The funding will also provide support for homeless shelter operations. The funds are made available through a supplemental appropriation to the Emergency Solutions Grant program through the federal CARES Act.

“Throughout the pandemic, our focus has always been on protecting the lives and livelihoods of Iowans,” said Gov. Reynolds. “The funds announced today will assist those at risk of eviction while also providing support to homeless shelters supporting Iowa’s homeless population at this critical time. I appreciate the continued collaboration with our federal partners in support of the state’s pandemic response.”

“Providing housing assistance for Iowans in need remains a top priority,” said Iowa Finance Authority Executive Director, Debi Durham. “The ability for Iowans to thrive and prosper begins with a safe, stable place to call home and the program announced today will be essential in helping Iowans get back on their feet.”

The Emergency Solutions Grant program will help to prevent households from becoming homeless due to eviction, assist Iowans who have lost their home to eviction to regain rental housing as well as provide homeless shelters with financial support to assist with operations and outreach as they work to serve Iowans in need and mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

To be eligible for eviction prevention assistance to avoid homelessness, Iowans must have an income of 50% of the area median income or less and be at imminent risk of eviction in addition to meeting other eligibility criteria. To be eligible for assistance in rapidly regaining housing, Iowans must be currently experiencing homelessness.

Examples of assistance available to eligible individuals include rent and utility payments, including in arrears, legal assistance, application fees, security and utility deposits, moving costs, case management and credit repair. All financial assistance is paid directly to landlords and service providers.

Individuals in need of assistance must apply through the Coordinated Entry helpline in their area, which is available along with additional eligibility and program information at iowahousingrecovery.com.

Thirty-five agencies were awarded a total of $8.8 million in Emergency Solutions Grant Program funds. The full list of awards is available here. The assistance will remain available until all funds are exhausted or September 30, 2022.

The Emergency Solutions Grant program is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Iowa Finance Authority in partnership with participating Iowa service agencies.



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Dovly, the Credit Repair Engine, Welcomes Todd Davis, Co-Founder and Former CEO of LifeLock, to Advisory Board

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PHOENIX, Dec. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Dovly, the credit repair engine that tracks, manages, and fixes your credit, today announced the appointment of Todd Davis, co-founder and former chief executive officer (CEO) of identity protection leader LifeLock, to its board of advisors.

“Todd is one of the most innovative marketers and business leaders in the personal finance industry,” said Nirit Rubenstein, CEO and co-founder of Dovly. “His unique understanding of consumer mindsets and financial technology enabled him to create and scale a transformational business. His insights will help us take Dovly to the next level.”

“Millions of Americans have at least one serious mistake on their credit reports,” Todd Davis, co-founder and former CEO of LifeLock, explained, “yet far too many of those people aren’t even aware of it, nor do they understand the impact these mistakes have on credit scores. Dovly is a game changer.”

After launching his career with Dell in the early 1990s, Davis co-founded LifeLock in 2005. Five years later, the company ranked eighth on Inc. Magazine’s list of the 500 fastest growing companies in America, and in 2012, the company went public. By 2014, LifeLock had over three million subscribers and 700 employees. Symantec acquired the company in February 2017 for $2.3 billion. Davis now serves as chairman of the board of Kadenwood and Aesthetics Biomedical.

Dovly also welcomed Jacky Chiu, the former vice president of product of LifeLock, to its advisory board. Chiu is the co-founder and chief technology officer of Brightside, a financial technology company that recently secured a $35 million series A funding round led by Andreessen Horowitz.

About Dovly

Dovly is an advanced credit repair engine that tracks, manages, and fixes your credit. Dovly’s fully automated technology enables customers to get ahead financially by leveraging credit intelligence to repair credit scores. The company is headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona, and has increased its customer base by 160% this year alone. In June of 2020, Dovly raised a $2.25 million round of seed funding led by NFX, with participation from 1984 Ventures.

Learn more at www.dovly.com.

SOURCE Dovly

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