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Generation Z Spending Habits for 2020

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generation z girl grocery shopping with her smartphone

Generation Z consists of those born after 1997. The eldest members of this cohort are in their early 20s, graduating college and entering the workforce. This generation differs greatly from all previous cohorts in saving, spending and overall money management habits.

Here are a few key characteristics of this generation:

  • Their ability to find answers quickly by accessing information online enables them to make informed decisions and become smart shoppers.
  • Many have called this generation the most financially savvy because of their keenness on saving and their entrepreneurial spirits.
  • This sense of independence and self-reliance is partially because of the digital world they grew up in.

Read on to learn more about Generation Z’s spending habits and their other financial patterns as we enter 2020.

How Generation Z Shops Online and Offline

Generation Z is known as the first digitally native generation and does not differentiate between online and offline channels. They expect the same quality and speed of an online channel to translate to stores. They’re also much savvier with online shopping channels than their predecessors and are not easily swayed by gimmicks or celebrity influencers. Take a look at how Gen Z shops.

Online Shopping Habits

Since this generation never knew a world without the internet, they have high expectations for online channels and low tolerance for any slowdowns or glitches. Members of this cohort are also used to quick service since 87 percent of Gen Z have high-speed internet at home. 

They’re also skeptical about giving away their information since they’ve grown up in an age of high-profile data breaches for major brands. Read through our stats below to learn how Gen Z behaves online:

  • 74 percent of Gen Z spends most of their free time online. (Source: IBM)
  • 75 percent of Gen Z consumers use mobile phones and smartphones the most compared to other devices. (Source: IBM)
  • 60 percent of Gen Z won’t use an app or website that loads slowly. (Source: IBM)
  • Consumers in Gen Z 60 percent more likely than the average consumer to hang up if the phone isn’t answered in 45 seconds. (Source: Marchex)
60 percent of gen zers won't use an app or website that's too slow to load
  • Less than one third of Gen Z is comfortable sharing personal details other than contact information and purchase history. (Source: IBM)
  • Only 18 percent of Gen Z is comfortable sharing payment information with their favorite brands. (Source: IBM)
  • 20 percent of Gen Z is willing to share public reviews online for things like restaurants and products. (Source: IBM)
  • 25 percent of Gen Z consumers spend more than five hours a day on their mobile phones. (Source: IBM)

Brick-and-Mortar Shopping Habits

Contrary to what you might think, the majority of Gen Z prefers to make purchases in store. One reason could be that they lack access to credit cards to make online purchases (although they do use debit cards). We may see this preference change over time.

However, it’s important to note that members of Generation Z are not blinded by technological “bells and whistles” with any shopping channel. Their priorities lie in the basic retail experience: product availability, quality products and efficient service. They may be swayed as long as any addition enhances the shopping experience. Read on to see what expectations Gen Z has for their brick-and-mortar shopping trips:

  • More than 98 percent of Gen Z prefers to make purchases in brick-and-mortar stores. (Source: IBM)
  • 66 percent of Gen Z consumers want very few products to ever be out of stock. (Source: IBM)
  • 65 percent of Gen Z consumers want to get real value for their money through things like discounts and rewards programs. (Source: IBM)
  • 56 percent of Gen Z shoppers want the store experience to be fun so they won’t get bored. (Source: IBM)
  • 48 percent of Gen Z consumers expect to be able to exchange or return items bought online in the store. (Source: Adyen)
more than 98 percent of gen z consumers prefer ot make purchases in brick-and-mortar stores
  • 66 percent of Gen Z consumers say they would visit a store more if they could check item availability beforehand. (Source: Adyen)
  • 33 percent of Gen Z shoppers expect to be able to buy online and pick up in-store. (Source: Adyen)
  • 39 percent Gen Z shoppers hope that “just walk out” stores will universally be the norm in the next 12 months. These types of stores allow shoppers to pick up the items they need and allow the store automatically charge them without needing to interact with a cashier or check out. (Source: Adyen)
  • About one in three Gen Z consumers want showrooms to be a part of the shopping experience in the next 12 months. “Showrooming” provides shoppers a physical place to examine products before buying them online. (Source: Adyen)
  • 44 percent of Gen Z shoppers want brands to use augmented reality or virtual reality to enhance the shopping experience in the next 12 months. (Source: Adyen)
more than half of gen zers use their smartphones in stores to compare prices
  • 53 percent of Gen Z consumers use their smartphones in stores to look at items that aren’t available in the store to see if there is anything else they’d prefer to buy. (Source: NRF)
  • 51 percent of Gen Z shoppers say that the ease of switching between channels is the most important for them when shopping. (Source: NRF)
  • 52 percent of Gen Z shoppers use their smartphones in stores to look up products at other stores for price comparisons. (Source: NRF)
  • Gen Z consumers had 14.6 billion restaurant visits in 2018. (Source: The NPD Group)
  • Gen Z makes up 25 percent of total foodservice traffic. (Source: The NPD Group)

How Gen Z Views Brands

Members of Generation Z expect brands to be transparent, ethical and responsible in all aspects of their business. Neglecting to do so can result in a lost opportunity to collect information or lost business altogether from this generation.

Product value is much more important to Gen Z than brand loyalty, so brands need to work extra hard to keep Gen Z’s business around. Take a look at different brand preferences Gen Z has and what they expect from today’s brands:

  • 46 percent of Gen Z say their friends’ recommendations and opinions matter to them when choosing a brand. (Source: IBM)
  • 66 percent of Gen Z shoppers want brands to sell high-quality products. (Source: IBM)
  • 45 percent of Gen Z consumers choose brands that are eco-friendly and socially responsible.  (Source: IBM)
  • 61 percent of Gen Z prefers brands that offer secure data storage and protection. (Source: IBM)
  • 43 percent of Gen Z shoppers prefer brands that provide clear terms and conditions in how they will use their information. (Source: IBM)
about 4 in 5 gen z consumers refuse to buy products from companies involved in scandals
  • When asked to define what brand loyalty means, 38 percent of Gen Z shoppers said it means they “sometimes buy the brand, but…would consider other alternatives that offer a lower price.” (Source: CrowdTwist)
  • 41 percent of Gen Z consumers have been influenced by Facebook ads. (Source: Adyen)
  • 60 percent of Gen Z consumers believe it’s important for brands to value their opinion. (Source: Adyen)
  • When giving feedback, Gen Z shoppers are twice as likely to give positive feedback than negative feedback. (Source: Adyen)
  • About 65 percent of Gen Z consumers try to learn the origins of the things they buy including where it’s made and what it’s made from. (Source: Mckinsey)
  • About 80 percent of Gen Z refuses to buy products from companies involved in scandals. (Source: Mckinsey)

Financial Habits

Despite their young age, Generation Z holds $44 billion in buying power alone. In addition to their own dollars, they also exercise a lot of influence over their households. Their digital savviness comes into play once again in this area. Their expertise enables them to guide their families through different purchase phases including product evaluation and the purchase itself.

Members of Gen Z are also financially savvy and keen on earning money, even at their young age. Entrepreneurialism is a key attribute of this generation and we’ll likely see them owning their own businesses and thriving in the gig economy instead of working traditional 9-to-5 jobs.

horizontal bar graph showing how gen z earns money
  • 58 percent of Gen Z consumers prefer to pay via debit card. (Source: CrowdTwist)
  • 29 percent of Gen Z spends most of their free time trying to earn extra money. (Source: IBM)
  • More than 70 percent of Gen Z consumers believe they influence family decisions on buying furniture, household goods and food and beverages. (Source: IBM)
  • 60 percent of Gen Z believe they influence their families’ clothes and shoes spending. (Source: IBM)
  • 77 percent of Gen Z consumers believe they influence family spending on food and beverages. (Source: IBM)
  • 75 percent of Gen Z spends more than half of their monthly income. (Source: IBM)

Gen Z vs. Millennials

Millennials have been center stage for many years. As that generation begins to age out, Generation Z is beginning to capture the world’s attention with their different spending, saving and earning habits. Millennial spending habits differ quite a bit from their Gen Z counterparts. This is partially because Gen Z is very price conscious and focuses on overall value when making buying decisions. We can see these differences when comparing preferences and priorities with different products and services.

  • Millennials are 50 percent more likely to consider brand alternatives that offer more compelling brand promises than Gen Z. (Source: CrowdTwist)
  • Gen Z is 50 percent more likely to say the presence of a loyalty program is a driver of brand loyalty than millennials. (Source: CrowdTwist)
  • 43 percent of Gen Z teens place importance on car safety features when making a purchase in comparison to 25 percent of millennials. (Source: Kelly Blue Book)
75 percent of millennials are willing to pay more for great customer experiences compared to 69 percent of generation z
  • 34 percent of millennials place importance on a car’s brand when making a purchase in comparison to 23 percent of Gen Z. (Source: Kelly Blue Book)
  • 75 percent of millennials are willing to pay more for great customer experiences compared to only 69 percent of Gen Z. (Source: Salesforce)
  • Only 63 percent of Gen Z trusts companies in comparison to 71 percent of millennials. (Source: Salesforce)

The 2.6 billion members of this generation are a group to watch as they grow up and enter the workforce. Their financial management looks to be off to a strong start thanks to their frugal mindsets and entrepreneurial attitudes. They’ve proven so far that they’re ready to responsibly make and manage their money to avoid the financial issues they’ve grown up with.

Teens and young adults should not only make plans to keep down debt, but also learn how to build and manage their credit. This includes applying for credit cards, keeping payments down and checking your credit report often to make sure everything is accurate. If you do find any inaccuracies on your credit report like an account you don’t recognize, you can call to learn about how Lexington Law’s credit repair services can help clean up your credit report.

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Credit Cards

Understanding Credit Card Security Codes

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Credit card security codes are an important security measure to prevent fraud and identity theft. They add an additional layer of safety when making purchases and help ensure the buyer is, in fact, the cardholder.

These security codes—often called CVV codes, short for “card verification value”—are three- or four-digit codes located directly on your credit card. They’re typically, but not always, asked for when making card-not-present transactions, such as those made online and over the phone. Here, we detail where to find them, how they work and why they’re important for consumer protection.

Where to Find Your CVV Code

The location of your CVV code depends on the credit card issuer:

  • Visa, Mastercard and Discover: The code will be three numbers on the back of the card to the right of the “authorized signature.”
  • American Express: The code will be four numbers on the front of the card above and to the right of the card number.
Where to locate your card's security code.

How to Find Your CVV Code Without the Card

Credit card security codes were designed to ensure that the person making a purchase actually has the card in their possession. Because of this, it’s impossible to look up your CVV code without having the physical card. This is why it’s important to have the physical card on hand if you need to make a purchase that requires a CVV code.

If an identity thief obtains your credit card number—for example, via shoulder surfing—may try to call the bank and pretend to be you in order to get the CVV code. However, banks typically don’t give out this information. Each financial institution has their own policies, but if you can’t read or access your CVV code, they will usually issue you a new card.

While most retailers require a CVV code when making card-not-present transactions, many don’t. In these instances, crooks would still be able to use your card.

How Are CVV Codes Generated?

According to IBM, CVV codes are generated using an algorithm. The algorithm requires the following information:

  • Primary account number (PAN)
  • Four-digit expiration date
  • Three-digit service code
  • A pair of cryptographically processed keys

Other Names for CVV Codes

Depending on the credit card company and when your card was issued, your security code may go by a different name. Even though there are many different abbreviations, the basic concept remains the same. Below are all the abbreviations and meanings for credit card security codes:

  • CID (Discover and American Express): Card Identification Number
  • CSC (American Express): Card Security Code
  • CVC (Mastercard): Card Verification Code
  • CVC2 (Visa): Card Validation Code 2
  • CVD (Discover): Card Verification Data
  • CVV (All): Card Verification Value
  • CVV2 (Visa): Card Verification Value 2
  • SPC (Uncommon): Signature Panel Code

Credit Card Security Code Precautions

While CVVs offer another layer of security to help protect users, there are still some things to be aware of when making card-not-present transactions.

  • Sign the back of your credit card as soon as you receive it.
  • Keep your CVV number secure. Never give it out unless absolutely necessary—and if you fully trust the person.
  • Review each billing statement to ensure there are no transactions you don’t recognize or didn’t authorize. If there are, contact your financial institution immediately and consider freezing your credit.
Credit card security precautions.

Protecting your identity requires constant vigilance—but emerging technology may have the potential to mitigate some of the risk of credit card fraud.

Shifting CVVs: The Future of Credit Card Safety?

Since chip-enabled cards replaced magnetic stripes, in-person credit card fraud has taken a big dip. Crooks are turning toward online and card-not-present methods of fraud. CVV codes are good at combating this type of fraud—but shifting CVVs, also referred to as dynamic CVVs, may be even better.

The technology works by displaying a temporary CVV code on a small battery-powered screen on the back of the card. The code regularly changes after a set interval of time. This helps thwart fraud because by the time a hacker has illegally obtained a shifting CVV code and tried to make a purchase, it will likely have changed.

Despite the security benefits, shifting CVVs haven’t been widely implemented due to high cost, and it remains to be seen if the technology and process can scale. Financial institutions have many measures in place, such as fraud alert, to notify you of potentially suspicious activity.

If you suspect you’ve been a victim of identity theft, call your credit card company, change your passwords and notify any credit bureaus and law enforcement agencies. By regularly checking your credit card statements, being careful about who you give your information to and being vigilant when making purchases, you’ll help do your part in keeping your identity secure.


Reviewed by John Heath, Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Born and raised in Salt Lake City, John Heath earned his BA from the University of Utah and his Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University. John has been the Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm since 2004. The firm focuses primarily on consumer credit report repair, but also practices family law, criminal law, general consumer litigation and collection defense on behalf of consumer debtors. John is admitted to practice law in Utah, Colorado, Washington D. C., Georgia, Texas and New York.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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How Do Credit Card Miles Work?

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

Credit card miles are rewards points that help you earn credits toward travel and other purchases. How credit card miles work and whether this type of rewards card might be a good idea for you depends on a few factors, which we’ll cover below.

What Are Credit Card Miles, and How Do They Work?

Credit card miles are similar to credit card points. They’re a reward that you earn by taking certain actions, including making eligible purchases with the card.

Once you earn enough miles, you can redeem them for rewards. They’re called miles because typically these types of rewards credit cards are aligned with an airline or travel service. That usually means the most value comes from redeeming miles for airfare or rewards miles in an airline program.

However, you can often choose to redeem them for other rewards, such as merchandise, hotel and other travel credits or gift cards at a lesser value per point.

How Are Credit Card Miles Different From Frequent Flier Miles?

In some cases, credit card miles and frequent flier miles may be the same thing. If you have an airline-branded card, such as a Delta SkyMiles credit card, your points may be in the form of the airline’s frequent flyer miles. You can redeem those for flights or other rewards within the frequent flyer program.

If you have a non-branded card, then you may earn generic credit card miles. Those may be redeemed for flights with numerous airlines or other rewards, typically via the credit card rewards program’s online portal.

Hotel rewards cards work in a similar manner. If it’s a branded card, you may earn rewards directly via the hotel chain’s membership rewards program.

How Do You Earn Credit Card Miles?

The exact way you earn credit card miles depends on your card. But typically, you can earn by spending with your card to qualify for various rewards.

Use Your Credit Card Often

Rewards cards are designed to promote spending. You usually earn a certain number of miles or points for every dollar you spend on qualified purchases. In some cases, you can earn more by spending with certain retailers or on certain categories.

For example, it’s common for an airline-themed card to reward more for spending in travel categories. You might earn 3x miles or 5x miles for every dollar you spend with a certain airline, for example, and one mile per dollar on all other purchases.

The key to earning a lot of miles is using the card as much as possible for things you would already be buying and then paying the balance off immediately so you don’t owe interest. For example, if you earn two miles per dollar spent at grocery stores, you could use your credit card to cover your grocery shopping each week.

If you spend $200 a week, that’s roughly 1,600 miles earned per month just for doing grocery shopping you already do.

Take Advantage of Sign-Up Bonuses

Many rewards cards come with sign-up bonuses, and this is a great way to earn a lot of credit card miles right from the start. Typically, the bonus requires you to spend a certain amount of money when you first open the card.

For example, you might earn 50,000 miles if you spend $5,000 in the first three months as an account holder. That sounds like a lot, but it’s often achievable just by using the credit card to cover all normal expenses, such as fuel, groceries and even utility bills. Just make sure you’re paying off the card balance regularly so you don’t end up with a high utilization rate and expensive interest.

Refer Your Friends

Some credit card rewards programs offer extra miles if you refer friends. If your friend applies for the card using your referral code and is approved, then you may be awarded extra credit card miles.

How Much Are Credit Card Miles Worth?

The value of credit card miles varies, but typically they’re worth about one cent. That means if a flight costs $400, you need 40,000 miles to cover it. In some cases, you may be able to raise the value of your miles by redeeming them through a select online portal or via certain airlines.

Redeeming Your Miles

Follow the general steps below, as well as any unique instructions from your credit card company or rewards program, to redeem miles.

Check Your Balance

First, find out how many miles or points you have. This is typically listed on your last statement, but most credit cards support online account access where you can get up-to-date information about your points. You can also call your credit card company or rewards customer service line to find out.

Understand the Limitations

Before you plan on using miles to pay for travel, look at the fine print to understand restrictions. Some rewards programs have blackout dates, which means you might not be able to use miles to pay for airfare during peak times. Others require mile minimums, which means you need a certain amount of miles to redeem to cover part or all of your airfare.

And miles do expire, so make sure you keep track of when you earned the miles and when they will expire so you can redeem them beforehand.

Have a Flexible Schedule

Being flexible about when exactly you travel can also help you get the most out of credit card miles. For example, in some cases you can save hundreds on airfare by leaving a day earlier or later than planned. That means your miles can stretch further to cover more trips or tickets.

Choosing the Best Card for You

Earning and using credit card miles helps you boost your spending power. With the right credit card, you’re getting more than your original purchase when you buy things. But you do need to stick to recommended credit card use, such as paying off your bill every month and keeping your balance as low as possible.

Otherwise, you could end up paying high interest rates or driving down your credit score, and the miles you might earn in the process are not valuable enough to make up for those costs.

Which card you should get depends on your personal needs and preferences. Popular options include the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, the Bank of America Travel Rewards card and the Capital One Venture Rewards card. These are unbranded cards that let you earn general miles.

If you fly regularly with a certain airline, you might be able to maximize value from a branded airline rewards card. Most rewards credit cards do require good or excellent credit. Check your credit before you apply so you know what cards you might qualify for.

And if you find anything inaccurate on your credit report that could be dragging down your score, reach out to Lexington Law for information on how we can help you dispute errors on your credit.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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Subsidized vs. Unsubsidized Loans – Lexington Law

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The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

The federal direct loan program offers subsidized and unsubsidized loans to college students. A federal direct subsidized loan is a loan where the government pays the interest while the student is in school. A federal direct unsubsidized loan is one in which the student is responsible for paying all interest, receiving no additional federal aid.

What Is the Difference Between Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans?

The main differences between federal direct subsidized and unsubsidized loans are the qualification criteria, the maximum limits and how the loan interest works.

A chart displaying the differences between subsidized and unsubsidized student loans.

Loan Qualifications

Subsidized: To qualify for a subsidized loan, you must be an undergraduate student who can demonstrate financial need based on the information you submit through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (“FAFSA”).

Unsubsidized: Unsubsidized loans are available to both undergraduate and graduate students, and there is no requirement to demonstrate financial need.

Maximum Loan Limits

Subsidized: Your school will determine exactly how much you can borrow each year, but there are federal limits. These limits are based on what year of school you are in and whether you file as a dependent or an independent. Subsidized loan limits tend to be lower than unsubsidized limits. The aggregate limit for an independent student with subsidized loans is $23,000.

Unsubsidized: Unsubsidized loan limits tend to be higher than subsidized loan limits. The aggregate limit for an independent student with unsubsidized loans is $34,500.

How Interest Accrues

Subsidized: The U.S. Department of Education pays the interest for subsidized loans as long as the student is enrolled in school at least half-time. They will also pay the interest during your grace period—defined as the first six months after leaving school—and any period of deferment. This means that the amount of the loan will not grow once the student graduates, since the government has been paying the interest.

Unsubsidized: Whether you’re an undergraduate or a graduate student, you’re responsible for paying all of the interest during the entire life of your unsubsidized loan.

What Are the Similarities Between Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans?

When it comes to interest rates, fees and the “maximum eligibility period”—the amount of time you’re able to take out loans—subsidized and unsubsidized loans are virtually the same.

Fees

On top of interest, you can expect to pay a small fee for both types of loans. This is approximately 1.06 percent of your total loan amount, and it is deducted from each loan disbursement. 

Both subsidized and unsubsidized student loans have a fee of 1.06% of the total loan amount.

Undergraduate Interest Rates

The interest rates for both subsidized and unsubsidized loans for undergraduate students are the same. Currently, the rate is at 2.75 percent for loans first disbursed from July 1st, 2020, to June 31st, 2021. The one exception is for direct unsubsidized loans for graduate students, which have an interest rate of 4.30 percent. 

Maximum Eligibility Period

For both loan types, the time in which you’re eligible for your loans is equal to 150 percent of the time of your program. For undergraduates pursuing a four-year bachelor’s degree, this means they will be eligible for their loans for six years. Those pursuing a two-year associate’s degree will be eligible for three years. This ensures that students can still receive loans even if they’re unable or choose not to graduate within the program’s time frame. 

How to Apply for Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans

Once you’re ready to apply for a federal direct loan, fill out the FAFSA. Your school will send you a detailed report of what student aid you’re eligible for. Any grants or scholarships are free money, so make sure to accept them. They’ll also decide which loans you’re eligible for, the amount you can borrow each year and what loan type you can get—subsidized or unsubsidized. 

No matter what type of student loan you go for, it’s important to understand how they affect your credit so that you can set yourself up for financial success after graduation. With responsible, on-time payments, you’ll be well on your way to healthy credit for life.


Reviewed by Cynthia Thaxton, Lexington Law Firm Attorney. Written by Lexington Law.

Cynthia Thaxton has been with Lexington Law Firm since 2014. She attended The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia where she graduated summa cum laude with a degree in International Relations and a minor in Arabic. Cynthia then attended law school at George Mason University School of Law, where she served as Senior Articles Editor of the George Mason Law Review and graduated cum laude. Cynthia is licensed to practice law in Utah and North Carolina.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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